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I have a simple function that is supposed to prompt the user for the company name, followed by a confirmation message box that asks the user "Would you like to order a Web Design package today?" The problem is with my 'if' and 'else if' statements. The 'if' statement should show an alert box "Thank you for your order" when the user clicks 'OK'; and an 'else if' statement that should show an alert box "We appreciate your time" when the user clicks 'Cancel'. The function is called by an onClick script. The prompt and confirmation boxes appear but I can't figure out why my if and else if boxes do not appear. What am I missing? Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

<SCRIPT language = "Javascript">

function submitOrder() {

var companyName = prompt("Please enter company name.", "")

var willOrderPackage = confirm("Would you like to order a Web Design package today?")

if (willOrderPackage == "true") {
   alert("Thank you for your order.")

}else if{
   alert("We appreciate your time.")
}
</SCRIPT>
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Christian, Anirudh Ramanathan, j0k, Jim Garrison, onof Sep 6 '12 at 6:05

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Y u no use semicolon? –  Anirudh Ramanathan Sep 5 '12 at 23:30
7  
Don't want to be rude, but you really should learn how to write code. First of all, that javascript looks like it was written in the 90's (upper case tag names, capitalized language name, no ending semicolon etc). Secondly, comparing a boolean value with a string 'true' clearly shows a lack of understanding of fundamentals. This is even more enforced with the fact that you left the condition for the second if statement. –  Christian Sep 5 '12 at 23:30
2  
@Christian I don't use semi-colons. I find them frivolous. (And please have a good argument before entering into a debate on why not using semi-colons is "bad" or "shows lack of understanding".) Also, none of the conventions inside the script element look "bad". I agree with the "true" bit or the dated container or invalid syntax .. –  user166390 Sep 5 '12 at 23:31
4  
"use strict"; mode enforces semicolons. –  Waleed Khan Sep 5 '12 at 23:45
7  
"Don't want to be rude," - but somehow, @Christian, you managed to overcome your distaste and point out "problems" that aren't actually errors. Uppercase tagnames are valid. The "missing" semicolons are not actually an error: personally I do use semicolons on every line, but only to avoid having to keep explaining ASI to workmates who don't understand it. "but you really should learn how to write code" - Isn't that what Tracie is doing here? "clearly shows a lack of understanding of fundamentals" - Like you're doing in insisting that semicolons are required? –  nnnnnn Sep 6 '12 at 0:13

5 Answers 5

There are actually two different if..else constructs. The first is a simple if-else:

if ( condition ) {
   // Do stuff if condition is true
} else {
   // Do stuff if condition is not true
}

The next is an if-else-if:

if ( condition ) {
   // Do stuff if condition is true
} else if ( differentCondition ) {
   // Do stuff if differentCondition is true
} else {
   // Do stuff if neither condition nor differentCondition is true
}

You can also use else-if as many times as you like, e.g.:

if ( condition ) {
   // Do stuff
} else if ( condition2 ) {
   // etc
} else if ( condition3 ) {
   // etc
} else if ( condition4 ) {
   // etc
} else {
   // etc
}

And every part of an if..else is optional, except for the initial if block. So if you don't want to do anything if condition is not true, you can just omit the else block entirely:

if ( condition ) {
   // do stuff if condition is true
}

HTH

Going beyond your question for a moment, the expression being evaluated in your if statement's condition is a bit wibbly-wobbly.

willOrderPackage will always be true or false, but it's important to note that true and "true" or false and "false" are different. The first is boolean, the second is a string.

So, your if statement should be asking:

if ( willOrderPackage == true ) {

Even better than that, when you evaluate an expression in an if statement, there's an implied == true at the end of it which is invisible. For instance:

if ( willOrderPackage == true ) {

would be interpreted as :

if ( (willOrderPackage == true) == true )

The benefit of this is that you can actually omit the whole == true bit from your code, so you can just write:

if ( willOrderPackage ) {

And effectively you're still saying "if willOrderPackage is true"

Hope that helps clear up a few things for you!

share|improve this answer

your else if has no condition, use else

as stated

if (willOrderPackage == "true") {
alert("Thank you for your order.")

is wrong: willOrderPackage is a boolean so it can be

(willOrderPackage == true)

or even better

(willOrderPackage)
share|improve this answer
2  
Thank you very much! –  Tracie Richardson Sep 5 '12 at 23:27
4  
willOrderPackage is also a Boolean so it shouldn't be compared to "true". –  jfriend00 Sep 5 '12 at 23:28
    
if attack = "true" launchNukes() –  Click Upvote Sep 5 '12 at 23:48
    
@TracieRichardson Please choose a correct answer if you are happy with one/it solved your problem –  mrmryb Sep 6 '12 at 1:06
    
Thank you all for your help. Actually the first response was correct. I used 'else' since the 'else if' had no condition. It worked! I'm in a JavaScript 101 class and this is very very basic stuff I'm learning just to get my feet wet. –  Tracie Richardson Sep 6 '12 at 1:16

also it's better to use :

if (willOrderPackage) {

instead of :

if (willOrderPackage == "true") {
share|improve this answer
2  
@pst, but it is a change that should also be made. –  jfriend00 Sep 5 '12 at 23:29
    
@jfriend00 I completely agree. I didn't read this as a "comment" post.. –  user166390 Sep 5 '12 at 23:29

Change to:

if (willOrderPackage) {
   alert("Thank you for your order.")

}else{
   alert("We appreciate your time.")
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - you got both recommended fixes. –  jfriend00 Sep 5 '12 at 23:30

This is how it's properly done:

<script type="text/javascript">

function submitOrder() {
    var companyName = prompt("Please enter company name.", "");
    var willOrderPackage = confirm("Would you like to order a Web Design package today?");

    if (willOrderPackage) {
        alert("Thank you for your order.");
    }else{
        alert("We appreciate your time.");
    }
}

</script>

Things I did:

  • modernized coding style
  • switched to type attribute instead of language
  • added semicolons on each ending line
  • removed redundant if keyword
  • added a closing curly bracket which was originally missing
  • removed comparison with a string true, comparison with boolean values do not need this
share|improve this answer
2  
That's not how it's properly done. Why are you saying if(willOrderPackage == "true")? First of all, you should be using the === operator when making strict comparisons. In addition, there's no need because you just check to see if(willOrderPackage). –  Jeremy Sep 5 '12 at 23:36
1  
There was no reason to add semi-colons. –  user166390 Sep 5 '12 at 23:36
    
I see you've edited. Thanks –  Jeremy Sep 5 '12 at 23:36
    
@pst Honestly, it's fine that you don't like the use of semi-colons. I don't agree with it, but I'm not going to argue against it because the markers of javascript obviously had some not-so-smart thoughts and this is how the language is now. Regardless, when teaching the language, it's best to teach best practices. There are tons of moments where a semi-colon is necessary, and teaching that to a beginner is vital. –  Jeremy Sep 5 '12 at 23:39
1  
@Christian Only if using a broken minifier. That is not my problem. That is a problem with broken tools. Just say "use strict;" already .. –  user166390 Sep 5 '12 at 23:49

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