Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Netbeans 7.2 when I type in setLookAndFeel(); it says the method isn't found. What did I do wrong?

import javax.swing.*;

public class SalutonFrame extends JFrame  {

    public SalutonFrame() throws UnsupportedLookAndFeelException {
        super("Saluton Mondo!");

        setLookAndFeel();

        setSize(350, 100);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Also, note that JFrame itself is not a JComponent. It doesn't have a Look & Feel, except the one provided by the host platform. –  trashgod Sep 6 '12 at 0:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To set the look and feel of a frame, you must do it before the constructor, via the UIManager. You can do it like so:

    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getCrossPlatformLookAndFeelClassName());
    JFrame someFrame = new JFrame();

or whatever class your look and feel you want to use is instead of the basic Java look shown in the example. See here for more info.

share|improve this answer

..the method isn't found.

Much like the method getPonyRide(). If we make up methods that are not defined in the class or any class it extends, the compiler will advise that they do not exist.

IDEs will typically show a drop-down menu of choices if you type something like..

instanceOfObject.

..or..

this.

At the moment the . is typed (or several moments later, depending on the speed of the development box), a list of possible methods and attributes should appear. Look carefully through the possibilities before choosing one.

Recommendations

  1. Don't extend frame, simply reference one. Prefer composition over inheritance.
  2. Don't call setSize(), instead call pack() after all components are added.
  3. Use JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE for the exit operation.
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, but I don't quite understand your first recommendation. It seems like you're implying that making a class an instance of JFrame is bad. It's a lot less troublesome, for me at least, than having to refer to the frame over and over again. –  fireshadow52 Sep 6 '12 at 2:24
    
@fireshadow52 If the frame has no custom methods, it should not be extended. Another way to express that is "prefer composition over inheritance". To lower the 'troublesome' factor, use an IDE. –  Andrew Thompson Sep 6 '12 at 2:35

Looks like you were reading the book "Sams Teach Yourself Java in 24 Hours, 6th edition?

Anyway, you can do that this way:

import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;
import javax.swing.*;

public class SalutonFrame extends JFrame {

    public SalutonFrame() throws UnsupportedLookAndFeelException {
        super("Saluton Mondo!");

        try {
            UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getCrossPlatformLookAndFeelClassName());
            JFrame someFrame = new JFrame();

            setSize(350, 100);
            setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        } 

        catch (Exception exc) {
            //  error handling
        }
    }
}

or you can do it this way:

import javax.swing.*;

public class SalutonFrame extends JFrame {

    public SalutonFrame() {

        super("Saluton Frame");
        setLookAndFeel();
        setSize(350, 100);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setVisible(true);
    }

    private void setLookAndFeel() {

        try {        

            UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getCrossPlatformLookAndFeelClassName());

        } catch (Exception exc) {
            //  error handling
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SalutonFrame sal = new SalutonFrame();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.