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When calling a javascript function, it only works if I pass in an int. It fails if I pass in a string.

For example, this is my controller where I'm passing in a list of people to the view.

public ActionResult Index()
{
    List<Person> people = new List<Person>();
    people.Add(new Person() { Id = 1, FirstName = "Geddy", LastName = "Lee" });
    people.Add(new Person() { Id = 2, FirstName = "Alex", LastName = "Lifeson" });

    return View(people);
}

In the view, I have this javascript function:

function RemovePerson(firstName) {
    alert(firstName);
}

My webgrid has a column that allows the user to delete a person:

gridPeople.Column(header: "", columnName: "",
    format: (person) => MvcHtmlString.Create(string.Format(
    "<a href='' onclick='RemovePerson({0}); return false;'>x</a>",
    person.FirstName))),      

As the code is shown, above, I get this error when I click the x to delete a person:

Uncaught Reference Error: Geddy is not defined

Why?

If I change the javascript to accept an int:

function RemovePerson(personId) {
    alert(personId);
}

And actually pass the int:

gridPeople.Column(header: "", columnName: "",
    format: (person) => MvcHtmlString.Create(string.Format(
    "<a href='' onclick='RemovePerson({0}); return false;'>x</a>",
    person.Id))), 

It correctly shows a message box with the int value. So why does this work when passing an int but not the name?

share|improve this question
    
My guess is that you need to enclose your string in quotes, otherwise your function tries to evaluate it as a variable –  Jack Sep 6 '12 at 2:29
    
It often helps to post what is actually received by the client. That way errors can be fixed based on the actual output rather than interpreting the possible output from the source code. –  RobG Sep 6 '12 at 2:37
    
@RobG Do you mean by posting the page source? –  Bob Horn Sep 6 '12 at 2:39
    
Yes, but just the relevant bit (e.g. the HTML for the A element), not the entire thing. –  RobG Sep 6 '12 at 3:35
    
"If I change the javascript to accept an int function RemovePerson(personId){... " - Note that you haven't changed the JS to accept an int: changing the name of RemovePerson()'s parameter from firstName to personId makes no difference. What you've changed is that you're calling it with a number. –  nnnnnn Sep 6 '12 at 3:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The reason is that you need to wrap the string variable in quotes.

Uncaught Reference Error: Geddy is not defined

That means it thinks you're referring to a variable named Geddy rather than the string literal "Geddy".

Here's what you use:

string.Format("<a href='' onclick='RemovePerson(\"{0}\"); return false;'>x</a>",
person.Id)
share|improve this answer
1  
That did it, but I couldn't use ""{0}"", I had to use \"{0}\". –  Bob Horn Sep 6 '12 at 2:35
    
@BobHorn my mistake. Update, for future googlers. –  McGarnagle Sep 6 '12 at 2:35
    
Thank you! I have to wait five minutes before I can accept. Waiting... –  Bob Horn Sep 6 '12 at 2:36
    
Do you know if I should be able to actually pass the Person object to the javascript method? function RemovePerson(person) { alert(person.FirstName); } –  Bob Horn Sep 6 '12 at 2:41
    
@BobHorn hm, to do that you'd have to JSON-encode it. –  McGarnagle Sep 6 '12 at 3:11

Besides,

string.Format("<a href='' onclick='RemovePerson(\"{0}\"); return false;'>x</a>",

person.FirstName);

To be strict, use

person.FirstName.Replace("\"", "\\\"")
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