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How to do a for do loop in bash shell for executing some application?

I have this code below, i want to run usb-servo app, given the value of usb-servo from 190 to 225, i have tried to run the code, but the for do didn't gave any output, my servo didn't move.

#! /bin/sh
i=190

sleep 0.4
for (( i=190;i<=225;i++ ))
do
echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 $i
done

#echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 195
#echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 200
#echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 205
#echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 210
#echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 215
#echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 220
#echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 225
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please post only relevant code. what are your expected results? –  Yuck Sep 6 '12 at 2:40
    
Why are you echoing a password to sudo? Put yourself in /etc/sudoers instead. That's what it's for. –  William Pursell Sep 6 '12 at 5:25

1 Answer 1

Your loop looks fine, but you can also try it using a range and see if that prints what you want:

for i in {190..225}; do
    echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 $i
done

If neither this nor your loop print the expected output, the problem is not with the loop. Probably an issue in your usb-servo command.

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i expect that the output is the movement of the servo with the i value, i've tried with in range, but it gave me the movement of the servo to 0. –  Faqih Sep 6 '12 at 2:53
    
What is the exact output when you run the command outside the loop with a hard-coded value instead of $i? –  chown Sep 6 '12 at 2:54
    
When i run outside the loop, the output is status of the servo rotor position, if i change i to value 190, then that is the exact value of the servo rotor position. –  Faqih Sep 6 '12 at 3:00
    
So, "190" does get printed to the screen when you run echo my_pass | sudo -S /usr/bin/usb-servo set 0 190, yes? –  chown Sep 6 '12 at 3:06
    
Yes it does get printed to the screen. –  Faqih Sep 6 '12 at 3:13

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