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I believe I read somewhere that there is a mysql configuration setting that prevents rows from being updated via the console unless there is a WHERE clause present.

I haven't been able to find it in the documentation, does that option exist?

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Is there any advantage of that? Considering I could always specify WHERE 1 –  Anirudh Ramanathan Sep 6 '12 at 2:53
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From a real case. I asked my DBA to update a certain password to "11111", he quickly wrote the sentence and pressed the enter without putting a where statement...we have..many users –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Sep 6 '12 at 2:55
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The advantage would be preventing me from updating all the rows in a table by mistake. There is no way to rollback transactions submitted directly via the console as far as I know. –  deb Sep 6 '12 at 2:55
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@DarkXphenomenon It forces you to explicitly put WHERE 1 if you really mean it, so if you forget the WHERE clause by mistake Bad Things don't happen. –  lc. Sep 6 '12 at 2:57
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@ItayMoav *had many users ;) –  Anirudh Ramanathan Sep 6 '12 at 2:59

3 Answers 3

That is MYSQL SAFE UPDATE MODE.

Check here.

And also the --safe-updates option.

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1  
It really should be called --put-a-cork-on-my-fork so you don't poke yourself in the eye with it. –  tadman Sep 6 '12 at 4:00

Just SET SQL_SAFE_UPDATES=0; before running your query.

See MySQL tips regarding safe mode.

For beginners, a useful startup option is --safe-updates (or --i-am-a-dummy, which has the same effect). It is helpful for cases when you might have issued a DELETE FROM tbl_name statement but forgotten the WHERE clause. Normally, such a statement deletes all rows from the table. With --safe-updates, you can delete rows only by specifying the key values that identify them. This helps prevent accidents.

You are not permitted to execute an UPDATE or DELETE statement unless you specify a key constraint in the WHERE clause or provide a LIMIT clause (or both). For example:

UPDATE tbl_name SET not_key_column=val WHERE key_column=val;

UPDATE tbl_name SET not_key_column=val LIMIT 1;
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Just to clarify, setting 'SET SQL_SAFE_UPDATES=0;' or starting MySQL with the --safe-updates option will only affect what I do in that session with that client, for example a web app accessing that same db can still update and delete rows regardless ...? –  deb Sep 6 '12 at 3:04
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@deb If you're running a query, SET SQL_SAFE_UPDATES=0; should only affect the transaction. –  Kermit Sep 6 '12 at 3:05

From the MySQL docs: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/mysql-tips.html

"4.5.1.6.2. Using the --safe-updates Option

For beginners, a useful startup option is --safe-updates (or --i-am-a-dummy, which has the same effect). It is helpful for cases when you might have issued a DELETE FROM tbl_name statement but forgotten the WHERE clause. Normally, such a statement deletes all rows from the table. With --safe-updates, you can delete rows only by specifying the key values that identify them. This helps prevent accidents.

[...]

You are not permitted to execute an UPDATE or DELETE statement unless you specify a key constraint in the WHERE clause or provide a LIMIT clause (or both)."

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