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I have a menu that resizes responsively, so the contents of a div (#menuWFhover) are re-arranged with each resize, and as a consequence the div has different heights depending on the window size.

When I use jQuery slideDown/Up, it works fine the first time but after a resize the div maintains the height of the previous animation. Is this because slideDown plays with the height to animate? This is a simplified version of what I'm using. If I replace/add a (windows)resize (which is my guess, that it has something to do with it) the animation doesn't happen, but I might be doing it wrong.

$(document).ready(function(){
        var WFover = function () {
            $('#menuWFhover').stop().slideDown(300);
        };
        var WFout = function () {
            $('#menuWFhover').stop().slideUp(300);
        };

        $('#menuNewBox').mouseover(WFover);
        $('#menuWFhover').mouseover(WFover);
        $('#menuNewBox').mouseout(WFout);
        $('#menuWFhover').mouseout(WFout);
});
share|improve this question
    
hey can we see the css of #menuWFhover #menuNewBox – Arpit Srivastava Sep 6 '12 at 3:46
    
I've encountered this problem many times. It's because of the stop(). If you stop while it's animation, it sets the new height of the element to the height where it stopped. You could use stop(true, true), which forces the animation to go to the end but it's ugly. I didn't find a "good" solution for this yet. I've always saved the height on DocumentReady and animated the height accordingly. Hope someone knows a better solution. – vyx.ca Sep 6 '12 at 3:57
    
@ComputerArts Interesting! Wouldn't have thought of it. Post it as answer please. – Yisela Sep 6 '12 at 4:03
up vote 5 down vote accepted

As ComputerArts mentioned, the problem is that jQuery sets the height of the div explicitly after it finishes the animation. It then reuses this explicit height even after you resize the div in your CSS.

Of course, nowadays, you should probably be using CSS animations for this kind of thing.
(See http://addyosmani.com/blog/css3transitions-jquery/)

If you need a jQuery solution, you could force the height to undefined after the animation is complete, so that jQuery picks up the current CSS height. Although, that changes the behaviour slightly:

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/brianpeiris/8zc5g/show

$(document).ready(function(){
        var WFover = function () {
            $('#menuWFhover').stop().slideDown(600), function () {
                $('#menuWFhover').height(''); 
            });
        };
        var WFout = function () {
            $('#menuWFhover').stop().slideUp(600), function () {
                $('#menuWFhover').height(''); 
            });
        };

        $('#menuNewBox').mouseover(WFover);
        $('#menuWFhover').mouseover(WFover);
        $('#menuNewBox').mouseout(WFout);
        $('#menuWFhover').mouseout(WFout);

    $(window).resize(function () {
        $.removeData($('#menuWFhover')[0], 'fxshow', true);
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 to you for suggesting CSS3 animations. -1 to Microsoft for not shoving IE updates down our throats to support them. – Eric Sep 6 '12 at 4:27
    
This webapp I'm working on needs support for IE7+, so go figure. No css3 animations! – Yisela Sep 6 '12 at 4:30
    
My suggestion for IE 7/8: Ask/force users to install Google Chrome Frame if possible. Also, the link I mentioned above describes how to implement CSS 3 animations with a jQuery fallback. – brianpeiris Sep 6 '12 at 4:32
    
Furthermore, are you absolutely sure you need to support IE 7? You should always target your application at actual usage not assumed usage. Unless you are developing an intranet application, chances are your IE 7 userbase is less than 1%. Global stats are already less than 1.5%. – brianpeiris Sep 6 '12 at 4:40
    
@brianpeiris actual usage, it's a quite specific public (yes, I swear. And it's the clients requirement anyhow). But IE8 has zero brain for css3 too. In this case I was just wondering why the slideDown didn't work like I expected, I was doing a tryout more than anything. The rest of the animations are done using positions and widths. – Yisela Sep 6 '12 at 4:52

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