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I want to write this script in bash with command line utils, for fun.

# make the corpus
echo -e "this \t is   a \n cor-pus;  \nthis  \t\nis \n\t sparta. \n" > corpus.txt

# munge, collapse whitespace, tokenize
cat corpus.txt | tr -d '.!@#$%^&*()-_=+' | tr '\t' ' ' | tr '\n' ' ' | tr -s ' ' | fmt -1 | uniq -c | sort -rn

i expect

   2 this
   2 is
   1 a
   1 corpus
   1 sparta

but i get

   1 this
   1 is
   1 a
   1 corpus
   1 this
   1 is
   1 sparta

uniq fails when piped fmt -1. perhaps there are eof chars i don't see with cat -e? how does uniq decide what are lines and what are files?

echo a a b | fmt -1 | uniq does what i expect it too, so i don't know why the ... | fmt -1 | uniq | ... in my script doesn't work.

Thanks

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3  
tr '\t' ' ' | tr '\n' ' ' | tr -s ' ' can be written tr -s '\t\n' ' ' –  William Pursell Sep 6 '12 at 4:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to sort before you call uniq, as uniq expects its input to be sorted. So:

< corpus.txt tr -d '.!@#$%^&*()-_=+' | tr -s '\t ' '\n' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
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ah, i only skimmed the man page. next time, i'll read every word! –  sam boosalis Sep 6 '12 at 12:29

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