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I have a matrix say

Z = [1 2 3;
     4 5 6;
     7 8 9]

I have to change its values, say at positions (2,2) and (3,1), to some specified value. I have two matrices rowNos and colNos which contain these positions:

rowNos = [2, 3]
colNos = [2, 1]

Let's say I want to change the value of elements at these positions to 0.

How can I do it without using for loop?

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Why would you want to avoid a loop here? –  Marcus Riemer Sep 6 '12 at 6:44
2  
@MarcusRiemer, Because I am going to apply this thing on large images. Huge ones in fact. And I feel, Vectorization will help my code run a lot faster than plain for loops. –  Shahensha Sep 6 '12 at 6:56
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use sub2ind, it'll convert your sub-indices to linear indices, which is a number pointing at one exact spot in the matrix (more info).

Z = [ 1 2 3 ; 4 5 6 ; 7 8 9];
rowNos = [2, 3];
colNos = [2, 1];

lin_idcs = sub2ind(size(Z), rowNos, colNos)

If you want to operate on all elements on a specific row and column (elements in higher dimensions that is), you can also address them using linear indexing. It only becomes a bit trickier of calculating them:

Z = reshape(1:4*4*3,[4 4 3]);
rowNos = [2, 3];
colNos = [2, 1];

siz = size(Z);
lin_idcs = sub2ind(siz, rowNos, colNos,ones(size(rowNos))); % just the first element of the remaining dimensions
lin_idcs_all = bsxfun(@plus,lin_idcs',prod(siz(1:2))*(0:prod(siz(3:end))-1)); % all of them
lin_idcs_all = lin_idcs_all(:);

Z(lin_idcs_all) = 0;

experiment a bit with sub2ind, and go through my code step-by-step to understand it.

It would've been easier if it was the first dimension you wanted to take all elements off, then you could have used the colon operator :

Z = reshape(1:3*4*4,[3 4 4]);
rowNos = [2, 3];
colNos = [2, 1];

siz = size(Z);
lin_idcs = sub2ind(siz(2:end),rowNos,colNos);
Z(:,lin_idcs) = 0;
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Thanks a lot @Gunther Struyf . One more small question. How do I extend it to 3-D matrix? What if Z was say 3x3x3 matrix. (I actually want to change RGB values of an image, so I have simplified it this way) So how there are 3 values associated with each position and I want to change them all with 3 other specified values. How do I do that? –  Shahensha Sep 6 '12 at 7:38
    
@Shahensha see edit^^ (you should've added that remark in your original question in the first place imho) –  Gunther Struyf Sep 6 '12 at 11:36
    
Thanks a lot @Gunter Struyf –  Shahensha Sep 12 '12 at 23:02
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Use sub2ind with multiple entries for rows and columns

Z(sub2ind(size(Z), rowNos, colNos))=0

Example:

Z = [1 2 3;
    4 5 6;
    7 8 9];

rowNos = [2, 3];
colNos = [2, 1];

Z(sub2ind(size(Z), rowNos, colNos))=0

Z =

     1     2     3
     4     0     6
     0     8     9
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot @gevang. One more small question. How do I extend it to 3-D matrix? What if Z was say 3x3x3 matrix. (I actually want to change RGB values of an image, so I have simplified it this way) So how there are 3 values associated with each position and I want to change them all with 3 other specified values. How do I do that? –  Shahensha Sep 6 '12 at 7:27
    
along the same lines with @Gunther Struyf, I would also suggest for 3-dim matrices (i.e. RGB-images) looping across the 3rd dimension, which is clean and not costy (even for huge 2d dimensions), i.e. c = [-1; -2; -3]; for i=1:3, Z(sub2ind(size(Z), rowNos, colNos, repmat(i, 1, size(rowNos,2)))) = c(i); end –  gevang Sep 6 '12 at 19:11
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You would like to do this

z(rowNos, colNos)

but you can not - MATLAB does a Cartesian product of the indices. You can do this trick

idx=(colNos-1)*size(z, 1)+rowNos;
z(idx)=0

Flatten the z-matrix and access it through a linear index, which is a combination of rowNos and colNos. Remember that MATLAB flattens the matrix by columns (column-based matrix storage).

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1  
which is essentially what sub2ind does, but this works only for 2d matrices (does the trick here of course, but for continuity it's easier to just use sub2ind) –  Gunther Struyf Sep 6 '12 at 7:04
    
For higher dimensions you can do the same trick, which is not really a trick but exactly what sub2ind does. But its true that this requires knowledge of MATLABs data structure. sub2ind frees you from that, but I like to know exactly how things work. –  angainor Sep 6 '12 at 8:07
    
(nofi) so you also calculate the mean of a vector using sum(x)/length(x) :p –  Gunther Struyf Sep 6 '12 at 10:58
    
well. I more often than not write mex files, so in a sense - yes :p I mostly had in mind the data structures, and how they work in MATLAB. –  angainor Sep 6 '12 at 11:42
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