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Here's my situation: I want to SELECT all entries from a database WHERE id = $id. But I want the results to be listed in a certain priority. If, criteria = $criteria, then I want those results displayed first. Otherwise, I just want to keep displaying the rest of the rows.

My question is this: will this solve my problem?

SELECT field1 WHERE (criteria=$criteria AND id = $id) OR id=$id  LIMIT 5

Will the query look at the () first? If not, is there another way to do this without splitting this into two separate queries?

Thanks,
Michael

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
SELECT  field1
FROM    mytable
WHERE   id = $id
ORDER BY
        criteria = $criteria DESC, id
LIMIT 5

, or this:

SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  field1
        FROM    mytable
        WHERE   id = $id
                AND criteria = $criteria
        ORDER BY
                id
        LIMIT 5
        ) q
UNION
FROM    (
        SELECT  field1
        FROM    mytable
        WHERE   id = $id
        ORDER BY
                id
        LIMIT 5
        ) q2
ORDER BY
        criteria = $criteria DESC, id
LIMIT 5

The latter is more efficient if you have an index on (id, criteria) (in this order).

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+1: This is how I'd do it. Strangely, you can't do this sort of thing in Oracle without a subquery because Oracle's way of doing it (rownumber) is applied before the order by. –  Powerlord Aug 4 '09 at 19:34
    
Does the location of DESC matter? I want the criteria first, in terms of highest id to lowest id. Should it be criteria = $criteria, id DESC instead? –  Dirk Aug 4 '09 at 19:34
    
@Michael: if you want highest id's first, use ORDER BY criteria = $criteria DESC, id DESC –  Quassnoi Aug 4 '09 at 19:37
    
Thanks, then what does the DESC in criteria = $criteria DESC do as opposed to criteria = $criteria –  Dirk Aug 4 '09 at 19:38
2  
@Michael: criteria = $criteria DESC is a boolean expression. TRUE are 1 and FALSE are 0. DESC makes TRUE values come first. –  Quassnoi Aug 4 '09 at 19:40

Not related to the original question, just to clarify: operator AND have higher priority than OR hence why a or b and c or d is equal to a or (b and c) or d

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SELECT field1
  FROM mytable
 WHERE id = $id
 ORDER BY CASE WHEN criteria = $criteria THEN 0 ELSE 1 END CASE
 LIMIT 5;

This will list rows matching the criteria before those not because zero comes before one.

If this won't work directly - as written - then put the info into a sub-query:

SELECT field1
  FROM (SELECT field1,
               CASE WHEN criteria = $criteria THEN 0 ELSE 1 END CASE AS ordering
          FROM mytable
         WHERE id = $id
       ) AS subqry
 ORDER BY ordering
 LIMIT 5;

Often, there will be other secondary criteria to determine the order of rows within the 0 vs 1 ordering.

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