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In C#, to overload an operator such as '+', '-' etc, I have to make the function a static member of the class:

class MyType
{
   /*...*/

   public static MyType operator+ (MyType a, MyType b)
   {
       MyType ret;
       /* do something*/
       return ret;
   }
}

As far as I know, in C++ this is how I can overload an operator:

class MyType
{
   /*...*/

public:
   MyType operator+ (MyType b) // *this is the first operand
   {
       MyType ret;
       /* do something*/
       return ret;
   }
};

The problem is that *this is the first operand, so the first operand must be of type MyType. For example, if I want to add MyType to an integer:

MyType a, b;
b = a + 1;  // Valid
b = 1 + a;  // Error

In C#, I can overload the '+' operator for each case.

My question is: can I do in C++ the same as in C#, use static operators? As far as I know, there is one way to do that, with friend operators, but they are lost when inheriting the function.

share|improve this question
1  
friend is your friend. –  Mehrdad Sep 6 '12 at 7:03
    
what do you mean "they are lost"? –  Mooing Duck Sep 6 '12 at 8:10
    
@MooingDuck I mean that the inherited functions loses the base friends. –  Tibi Sep 6 '12 at 8:19
    
that doesnt make the function not work, nor does it prevent you from overloading. The fact that the derived doesnt keep base's friends should not be an issue. If it is, use virtual member functions. –  Mooing Duck Sep 6 '12 at 8:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Make the operator+ overload with int on the left hand side a free function instead of a member function of MyType:

class MyType
{
  ...

  // MyType + int can be a member function because MyType
  // is the type of the sum's left hand side
  MyType operator+(int rhs) const;
};

// int + MyType needs to be a free function because
// int is the type of the sum's left hand side
MyType operator+(int lhs, const MyType &rhs);

Another common idiom is to make the overloads a friend of the class of interest. Now you can implement both cases in the same way:

class MyType
{
  ...

  friend MyType operator+(int lhs, const MyType &rhs)
  {
    // get access to MyType's private members here
    // to implement the sum operation
    ...
  }

  friend MyType operator+(const MyType &lhs, int rhs)
  {
    // you can also implement the symmetric case
    // of int on the right hand side here
    ...
  }
};

Note that even though the operator+ overloads look like member functions in the 2nd example, they are actually free functions that live in the global scope due to their declaration as friends of MyType.

share|improve this answer

You can define an operator in the global scope in C++, e.g.

MyType operator+ (const MyType& a, const MyType& b)
{
    MyType ret;
       /* do something*/
    return ret;
}

You may need to add a friend declaration to MyType if the operator should access private members of the class.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe take them by const reference... –  Mehrdad Sep 6 '12 at 7:04
1  
@Mehrdad: Just corrected the typo. –  Andrey Sep 6 '12 at 7:05

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