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I'm trying to understand which of two solutions are preferred from a performance perspective. For example, I have two pieces of code:

1) Boxing / Unboxing

int val = 5;
Session["key"] = val; 
int val2 = (int)Session["key"];

2) Casting (IntObj has int Value property to store int)

IntObj val = new IntObj(5);  
Session["key"] = val;
int val2 = ((IntObj )Session["key"]).Value;

What is the memory management difference between these examples? Is there a faster way to perform such operations?

NOTE: Session is just for example, it can be any Dictionary<string, object>

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2  
I haven't measured it but I would say that primitives would be faster. An object has overhead. But in this case I think readability is a much more important measure. Cpu cycles are a lot cheaper than brain cycles – Sjuul Janssen Sep 6 '12 at 7:14
up vote 6 down vote accepted

It looks like what you are really doing here is comparing manual boxing with inbuilt boxing. The inbuilt boxing has been highly optimised - so I wouldn't expect to see a huge difference here, but we can check. Importantly, note that both have the same memory impact: one heap object containing one int field, per int boxed/wrapped.

The following shows pretty-much identical times for the two approached; I would say, therefore, just box it the direct / inbuilt way.

Note: run it in release mode, without a debugger (ideally at the command line). Note the first call is there to pre-JIT everything.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
public sealed class IntObj
{
    public readonly int Value;
    public IntObj(int value)
    {
        Value = value;
    }
}
static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Run(1, 0, false);
        Run(100000, 500, true);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
    static void Run(int length, int repeat, bool report)
    {
        var data = new object[length];

        int chk = 0;
        var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int j = 0; j < repeat; j++)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
            {
                data[i] = i;
                chk += i;
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        if(report) Console.WriteLine("Box: {0}ms (chk: {1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);
        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int j = 0; j < repeat; j++)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
            {
                chk += (int) data[i];
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        if (report) Console.WriteLine("Unbox: {0}ms (chk: {1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);

        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int j = 0; j < repeat; j++)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
            {
                data[i] = new IntObj(i);
                chk += i;
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        if (report) Console.WriteLine("Wrap: {0}ms (chk: {1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);
        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int j = 0; j < repeat; j++)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
            {
                chk += ((IntObj)data[i]).Value;
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        if (report) Console.WriteLine("Unwrap: {0}ms (chk: {1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);
    }


}
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Thanks! Now it's easy to see that :) – Alex Dn Sep 6 '12 at 8:46

So what is faster, DIY boxing with an IntObj or the built-in boxing?

My guess would be the built-in variety. Chances are that both compilers are optimized to deal with it.

Does exist more "fast" way to perform such operations?

The preferred approach is always to avoid it for large datasets. For small sets it simply doesn't matter.

share|improve this answer
    
I gave a Session just for example, it may be a simple Dictionary<string, object>/ – Alex Dn Sep 6 '12 at 7:11
    
I assumed the question was about IntObj. The container (Session) is not very relevant. – Henk Holterman Sep 6 '12 at 7:14

Fastest way to do something is not do it at all. Try to restructure your data to avoid large amount of boxing to gain more type safety, readability and potentially performance at the same time.

I find it unlikely that you need to store large amount of unrelated integer (or other value type) elements in the untyped dictionary. Usually values are organized into some objects that make sence together, in this case you store top level object in the untyped dictionary and only need one cast. For deeper elements you would use strongly typed classes (like Dictionary<string,int>) where this problem is solved already since no boxing is needed.

If you feel that in your case you really need to store large number of int (or other value type elements) in string=>opbject map it should be very easy to perform measurements yourself using your dataset adn your goals to see if either of versions have significant benefits. If both satisfy your goals (likly) - pick one that produces most readable code (I.e. for me it would be first variant).

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I categorized different types of IL instructions generated by C# cast operator:

Boxing (box IL instruction) and unboxing (unbox IL instruction) Casting through the inhertiance hierarchy (like dynamic_cast in C++, uses castclass IL instruction to verify) Casting between primitive types (like static_cast in C++, there are plenty of IL instructions for different types of casts between primitive types) Calling user defined conversion operators (at the IL level they are just method calls to the appropriate op_XXX method).

The difference is that casting allocates additional memory as a new reference type is created.

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3  
So how does that answer the question? (Boxing also creates a new instance on the heap) – Henk Holterman Sep 6 '12 at 7:18

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