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I have some tags which I need to insert into the Tag database. The Tag database has only one column 'tag' which is also the primary key. This was the trick to prevent duplicates while inserting.

So now the code and the problem.

foreach (string tagval in tagarray)
{
    try
    {
        var tag = new Tag
        {
            Tag1 = tagval
        };
        db.AddToTags(tag);
    }
    catch
    {
    }
}
db.SaveChanges();

The problem with this approach is after calling SaveChanges() if a duplicate is found early, the program exists without saving the other tags. If I call SaveChanges() after every addition to the table, the program will become inefficient and a lot of calls would need to be made. How to continue insertion even after the earlier insertions fail?

An alternate solution is also welcomed.

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3 Answers 3

Couple of things you need to change here. First off, you're best off removing the duplicates from your own list before going anywhere near the database by calling .Distinct on your list to insert.

Also, there is no need for the try catch here, you should just check what's already in your database before your do the insert. Try this:

List<string> uniqueItems = tagarray
    .Distinct()
    .Where(x => !db.Tags.Contains(x))
    .ToList();

foreach (string uniqueItem in uniqueItems)
{
    var tag = new Tag
    {
        Tag1 = tagval
    };
    db.AddToTags(tag);   
}

db.SaveChanges();
share|improve this answer
    
The Tag database has a lot of entries and likely will reach a million in few days, wouldn't checking be inefficient? –  Ashwin Singh Sep 6 '12 at 7:40
    
If my memory serves me correct and EF works the same way as NHibernate does, then it should do a JOIN, so it should be one query. Check it out in the output window, I'd be interested to see :). –  mattytommo Sep 6 '12 at 7:51

With Entity Framework and an ObjectContext derivation you could do somthing like this.

foreach (var newTag in tagarray.Select(t => 
               new Tag { Tag1 = t }).Except(db.Tags))
{
    db.Tags.AddObject(newTag);
}

try
{
    db.SaveChanges(SaveOptions.AcceptAllChangesAfterSave);
}
catch (OptimisitcConcurrencyException)
{
    db.Refresh(RefreshMode.StoreWins, db.Tags);
    foreach (var newTag in tagarray.Select(t => 
                   new Tag { Tag1 = t }).Except(db.Tags))
    {
        db.Tags.AddObject(newTag);
    }
    db.SaveChanges();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Its not linq to sql, apparently the use of dataContext is causing the confusion. Its entity framework. –  Ashwin Singh Sep 6 '12 at 7:37
    
I found that the confusion was compounded by the linq-to-sql tag but I see that has now been replaced with the entity-framework tag. –  Jodrell Sep 6 '12 at 8:12
foreach (string tagval in tagarray)
{
    try
    {
        var tag = new Tag
        {
            Tag1 = tagval
        };
      if(Tags.Where(e =>tag ) != null)
        {
        dataContext.AddToTags(tag);
        }
    }
    catch
    {
    }
}
dataContext.SaveChanges();
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain how your added code works? –  Ashwin Singh Sep 6 '12 at 7:42
    
Tags.Where(e =>tag ) search that there is any possible tag with same value exist in tags if it fount any occurance it skip dataContext.AddToTags(tag); and prevent from duplicate values –  Gyan Chandra Srivastava Sep 6 '12 at 7:46
    
What about efficiency? If there a lot of tuples in the database, wouldn't it be inefficient? –  Ashwin Singh Sep 6 '12 at 7:47
    
You need to use a transaction or it can fail in concurrence edge cases. –  Esben Skov Pedersen Sep 6 '12 at 7:55
    
i have this solution with my hands i think it will have good efficiency –  Gyan Chandra Srivastava Sep 6 '12 at 7:56

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