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There is a class obj, which has three properties:firstValue, secondValue, thirdValue, all of them range from 0 to 255. There is a List of those objects, I have to divide them into 32 different regions according to their properties, so I use the if-else statement like this:

if (obj.firstValue < 15 )
{
    if(obj.secondValue <200)
    {
        if(obj.thirdValue <125)
            maincolor[0]++;
        else
            maincolor[1]++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[2]++;
        else
            maincolor[3]++;
    }
}
else if (obj.firstValue < 41)
{
    if (obj.secondValue < 200)
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[4]++;
        else
            maincolor[5]++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[6]++;
        else
            maincolor[7]++;
    }
}
else if (obj.firstValue < 90)
{
    if (obj.secondValue < 200)
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[8]++;
        else
            maincolor[9]++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[10]++;
        else
            maincolor[11]++;
    }
}
else if (obj.firstValue < 128)
{
    if (obj.secondValue < 200)
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[12]++;
        else
            maincolor[13]++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[14]++;
        else
            maincolor[15]++;
    }
}
else if (obj.firstValue < 166)
{
    if (obj.secondValue < 200)
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[16]++;
        else
            maincolor[17]++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[18]++;
        else
            maincolor[19]++;
    }
}
else if (obj.firstValue < 196)
{
    if (obj.secondValue < 200)
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[20]++;
        else
            maincolor[21]++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[22]++;
        else
            maincolor[23]++;
    }
}
else if (obj.firstValue < 205)
{
    if (obj.secondValue < 200)
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[24]++;
        else
            maincolor[25]++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[26]++;
        else
            maincolor[27]++;
    }
}
else
{
    if (obj.secondValue < 200)
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[28]++;
        else
            maincolor[29]++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (obj.thirdValue < 125)
            maincolor[30]++;
        else
            maincolor[31]++;
    }
}

I use the maincolor[i] to record the max number of the region. Everything works well, but I just want to know is there any way to make it more readable and less of a performance cost?

Thinks in advance.

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2  
How do you know that this is a perf hog? Did you test it? –  Tony The Lion Sep 6 '12 at 7:57
2  
I don't see how a bunch of basic comparisons could be a perf hog... Unless you're doing millions of them, but even then. –  Tony The Lion Sep 6 '12 at 7:58
    
I wouldn't have thought this was a performance problems because it seems to me that at worst you have to at most evaluate 9 times to find the index of maincolor to increment. –  Chris Moutray Sep 6 '12 at 8:04
1  
The only thing I would say about this code is it looks to me to be a maintenance nightmare. –  Chris Moutray Sep 6 '12 at 8:06
    
See my answer - just something to consider really –  Chris Moutray Sep 7 '12 at 9:25
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7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This answer is almost similar to most of the answers here. I just want to stress the use of the break once you found a matching value here:

        int[] limitList = new int[] { 15, 41, 90, 128, 166, 196, 205 };
        int index = 0;
        foreach(int val in limitList)
        {
            if (obj.firstValue < val)
                break; //break on first encounter
            index += 4;
        }

        if (obj.secondValue >= 200)
            index+=2;

        if (obj.thirdValue >=125)
            index++;

        maincolor[index]++;
share|improve this answer
    
@ellic, see my answer - as GazTheDestroyer has pointed out, make sure to construct the array limitList (in this answer) outside of your method eg as a static array. –  Chris Moutray Sep 7 '12 at 10:44
    
@ellic, if you concern about performance, Chris answer is better. Creating and accessing an array does have some performance penalty. Usually the performance difference is very noticeable when dealing with very big iteration. –  mbm Sep 8 '12 at 14:02
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Untested, but you get the drift.

EDIT: I've reversed the algorithm to allow early bailout.

int[] firstCutoffs = new int[] { 15, 41, 90, 128, 166, 196, 205 };
int index;

for (int n = 0; obj.firstValue > firstCutoffs[n] && n < firstCutoffs.Length; n++)
    index += 4;

if (obj.secondValue >= 200 )
    index += 2;

if (obj.thirdValue >= 125 )
    index ++;

maincolor[index]++;
share|improve this answer
    
Personally I don't think this will offer any optimization (which is the point of the question) - See Loop Unwinding > en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loop_unwinding It does however tidy up the code –  Chris Moutray Sep 6 '12 at 8:29
    
Code tidying was my primary motivation. I don't think you're going to get any faster than hard coded branching. –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 6 '12 at 8:34
    
See my answer - just something to consider really –  Chris Moutray Sep 7 '12 at 9:28
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When you have three nested if conditions, you can be almost certain that you're doing something wrong.

C# is an object oriented language, so you have to think object!

For instance:

class ColorRange
{
    public Range RedRange { get; set; }
    public Range GreenRange { get; set; }
    public Range BlueRange { get; set; }
}

class Range
{
    public int Minimum { get; set; }
    public int Maximum { get; set; }

    public bool IsInRange(int value)
    {
        return value >= this.Minimum && value < this.Maximum;
    }
}

Then make a GetColorRange method somewhere:

public ColorRange GetColorRange(int red, int green, int blue)
{
    foreach (var colorRange in this.Ranges)
    {
        if (colorRange.RedRange.IsInRange(red)
            && colorRange.GreenRange.IsInRange(green)
            && colorRange.BlueRange.IsInRange(blue))
        {
            return colorRange;
        }
    }

    return null;

    /*
        Or with Linq:
        return this.Ranges.FirstOrDefault(colorRange => 
            colorRange.RedRange.IsInRange(red)
            && colorRange.GreenRange.IsInRange(green)
            && colorRange.BlueRange.IsInRange(blue));
    */
}

Usage:

var colorRange = GetColorRange(20, 175, 200);

// increment the count of this color range in your array

Of course, you're not supposed to use this code 'as is'. It's just to show you how you could redesign your algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
This is going to impact performance, increasing the number of g/leq checks. –  Rawling Sep 6 '12 at 8:35
1  
@Rawling I'm pretty sure OP isn't in a situation where a few more checks will have a noticeable impact on performance. And if performance is really an issue, one can keep the same approach and put the ColorRange objects in a tree-like structure to avoid useless checks –  KooKiz Sep 6 '12 at 8:39
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You can try to gain some readability by using LINQ:

// be allObjects an IEnumerable<obj>
maincolor[0] = allObjects.Count(o => o.firstValue < 15 && o.secondValue < 200 && o.thirdValue < 125);
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To make the code more readable you could use a 3-dimension array to store the main color category.

int[,,] mainColorCategories = new int [8,2,2];

(note, there are 8 categories for first value, 2 for second and third)

Populate this accordingly with the indices into the main colour array. Then to implement your code you'd implement three functions to determine the indices into this array. These functions need to perform the "if-else-if" evaluations you perform in your code snippet.

int firstValueIndex = getFirstValueIndex(obj.firstValue);
int secondValueIndex = getSecondValueIndex(obj.secondValue);
int thirdValueIndex = getThirdValueIndex(obj.thirdValue);

Then you can increment the correct main color array

int mainColorCat = mainColorCategories[firstValueIndex,secondValueIndex,thirdValueIndex];
maincolor[mainColorCat]++;
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I liked this question, I have tried this with a little of LinQ

    Dictionary<int,int> firstValue = new Dictionary<int,int>();
    firstValue.Add(15,0);
    firstValue.Add(41,4);
    firstValue.Add(90,8);
    firstValue.Add(128,12);
    firstValue.Add(166,16);
    firstValue.Add(196,20);
    firstValue.Add(205,24);
    firstValue.Add(256,28);

    int mainIndex = 0;
    KeyValuePair<int,int> firstIndex = firstValue.FirstOrDefault(x => obj.firstValue < x.Key);
    mainIndex = firstIndex.Value;
    mainIndex += (obj.secondValue < 200 ? 0 : 2);
    mainIndex += (obj.thirdValue < 125 ? 0 : 1);
    maincolor[mainIndex]++;  

First, I have stored all of your test condition values for the firstValue in a Dictionary with the proper base index to the maincolor, then is simply a math operation to add the remainder values to the index. The advantage is the clear indication of your limits in the Dictionary add methods.

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I thought I'd throw this in to the pot for your consideration now that you've accepted an answer.

int index = 0;

if (obj.firstValue < 15)
    index = 0;
else if (obj.firstValue < 41)
    index = 4;
else if (obj.firstValue < 90)
    index = 8;
else if (obj.firstValue < 128)
    index = 12;
else if (obj.firstValue < 166)
    index = 16;
else if (obj.firstValue < 196)
    index = 20;
else if (obj.firstValue < 205)
    index = 24;
else
    index = 28;

if (obj.secondValue >= 200)
    index += 2;

if (obj.thirdValue >= 125)
    index++;

maincolor[index]++;

Its much more easier on the eye compared to your original posted coded and has the same performance.


I was interested to see what the performance difference was between your original code vs my code vs the other answers posted and its become clear to me that using a loop will hurt your performance. I commented @GazTheDestroyer answer that it wouldn't be any faster (See Loop Unwinding > en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loop_unwinding).

So I wrote a little program to compare the different answers and found that generally the loop type answers are much slower eg @mbm answer. The caveat here is that the performance hit becomes noticeable only when you have a large number of objects to iterate through so in my app I tested with 1000000 items (objects with 1st, 2nd, and 3rd properties).

Just to give you an idea of results for 1000000 items:

  • Your original code and my example code above executes in about 120 milliseconds
  • Both @mbm and @Steve answers (using loops) execute in about 650 and 750 milliseconds (respectively). Much, much slower!

I've uploaded the code for the program to github > https://github.com/mouters/SO12295374_SpeedTest so feel free to download and test.

share|improve this answer
    
The performance hit is nothing to do with the loop, it's the array construction. Move the array to a static member and performance is only fractionally slower. (79ms vs 62ms on my machine) –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 7 '12 at 9:54
    
@GazTheDestroyer bah I feel stupid! But its still slower :) –  Chris Moutray Sep 7 '12 at 10:38
    
Actually this is a very good point that @ellic should be aware of when using mbm's answer –  Chris Moutray Sep 7 '12 at 10:41
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