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I'm using a simple unzip function (as seen below) for my files so I don't have to unzip files manually before they are processed further.

function uncompress($srcName, $dstName) {
    $string = implode("", gzfile($srcName));
    $fp = fopen($dstName, "w");
    fwrite($fp, $string, strlen($string));
    fclose($fp);
}

The problem is that if the gzip file is large (e.g. 50mb) the unzipping takes a large amount of ram to process.

The question: can I parse a gzipped file in chunks and still get the correct result? Or is there a better other way to handle the issue of extracting large gzip files (even if it takes a few seconds more)?

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3 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

gzfile() is a convenience method that calls gzopen, gzread, and gzclose.

So, yes, you can manually do the gzopen and gzread the file in chunks.

This will uncompress the file in 4kB chunks:

function uncompress($srcName, $dstName) {
    $sfp = gzopen($srcName, "rb");
    $fp = fopen($dstName, "w");

    while (!gzeof($sfp)) {
        $string = gzread($sfp, 4096)
        fwrite($fp, $string, strlen($string));
    }
    gzclose($sfp);
    fclose($fp);
}
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1  
Sweet! Tested on a 1MB gzip file that extracts to 48MB - before: Process time: 12.1447s, Peak memory use: 96512kB - Your solution: Process time: 0.6705s, Peak memory use: 256kB Thank you :) –  Luke Aug 4 '09 at 22:14
    
You may get better performance by tweaking the number at the end of the gzread call. I haven't tried it though. –  Powerlord Aug 5 '09 at 13:36
    
20 times better is good enough, and will remain good enough for a very long time. I would have to be very desperate or using huge files to try and tweak this thing further :) –  Luke Aug 21 '09 at 17:22
1  
while ($string = gzread($sfp, 4096)) approach may lead to such a bug: If the returned string is "0" (literal string that contains "0") then it will evaluate to false and fall out of the while loop. Too rare condition but it may happen some day. A better approach might ve while (($string = gzread($sfp, 4096)) != ''). In PHP, false == '0' gives true but '' == '0' gives false. –  maliayas Apr 15 '13 at 23:26
    
this function didn't work for me. it extracts a big file but all empty. if i use 'tar' from command line then it works fine. –  sparrow Nov 29 '13 at 9:45
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If you are on a Linux host, have the required privilegies to run commands, and the gzip command is installed, you could try calling it with something like shell_exec

SOmething a bit like this, I guess, would do :

shell_exec('gzip -d your_file.gz');

This way, the file wouldn't be unzip by PHP.


As a sidenote :

  • Take care where the command is run from (ot use a swith to tell "decompress to that directory")
  • You might want to take a look at escapeshellarg too ;-)
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Thank you, I do have shell access, but have yet to learn how to use it. –  Luke Aug 21 '09 at 17:32
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try with

function uncompress($srcName, $dstName) {
    $fp = fopen($dstName, "w");
    fwrite($fp, implode("", gzfile($srcName)));
    fclose($fp);
}

$length parameter is optional.

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It seems as if this approach does the same as the original approach using a large amount of memory. The whole file is being read and held in memory. –  Luke Aug 21 '09 at 17:37
    
are not loaded into a variable data file (similar to streaming). is not an object model where load the object string. This example does not affect "php_value memory_limit". your example affects this variable in "php.ini" file. –  andres descalzo Aug 21 '09 at 18:01
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