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I use this regex to split a string at every say 3rd position:

String []thisCombo2 = thisCombo.split("(?<=\\G...)");

where the 3 dots after the G indicates every nth position to split. In this case, the 3 dots indicate every 3 positions. An example:

Input: String st = "123124125134135145234235245"
Output: 123 124 125 134 135 145 234 235 245.

My question is, how do i let the user control the number of positions where the string must be split at? In other words, how do I make those 3 dots, n dots controlled by the user?

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6  
Isn't it better to just use substring in a loop? –  Aske B. Sep 6 '12 at 8:17
    

5 Answers 5

For a big performance improvement, an alternative would be to use substring() in a loop:

public String[] splitStringEvery(String s, int interval) {
    int arrayLength = (int) Math.ceil(((s.length() / (double)interval)));
    String[] result = new String[arrayLength];

    int j = 0;
    int lastIndex = result.length - 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < lastIndex; i++) {
        result[i] = s.substring(j, j + interval);
        j += interval;
    } //Add the last bit
    result[lastIndex] = s.substring(j);

    return result;
}

Example:

Input:  String st = "1231241251341351452342352456"
Output: 123 124 125 134 135 145 234 235 245 6.

It's not as short as stevevls' solution, but it's way more efficient (see below) and I think it would be easier to adjust in the future, of course depending on your situation.


Performance tests (Java 7u45)

2,000 characters long string - interval is 3.

split("(?<=\\G.{" + count + "})") performance (in miliseconds):

7, 7, 5, 5, 4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2

splitStringEvery() (substring()) performance (in miliseconds):

2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0

2,000,000 characters long string - interval is 3.

split() performance (in miliseconds):

207, 95, 376, 87, 97, 83, 83, 82, 81, 83

splitStringEvery() performance (in miliseconds):

44, 20, 13, 24, 13, 26, 12, 38, 12, 13

2,000,000 characters long string - interval is 30.

split() performance (in miliseconds):

103, 61, 41, 55, 43, 44, 49, 47, 47, 45

splitStringEvery() performance (in miliseconds):

7, 7, 2, 5, 1, 3, 4, 4, 2, 1

Conclusion:

The splitStringEvery() method is a lot faster (even after the changes in Java 7u6), and it escalates when the intervals become higher.

Ready-to-use Test Code:

pastebin.com/QMPgLbG9

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Isn't this just premature optimization? –  thedayturns Sep 6 '12 at 23:00
4  
@thedayturns Why are you posting that statement with a question mark? Don't be unsure of your accusations. It's one of those accusations that should be used against people who waste their time with unnecessary performance improvements. Anyway, this is fastly written, ready-to-use code; easier to understand, to me at least; and on the plus side, it runs e.g. 60 times faster in the last case (it grows exponentially with the interval). My whole performance research act may be unnecessary, but now it's there for generations to come. –  Aske B. Sep 7 '12 at 6:58
    
Good response. I thought about it, and I think you're right - the highest voted answer is probably even more confusing than this one. On the other hand, the google guava solution is better than both you're fine with including another library. –  thedayturns Sep 8 '12 at 7:35
1  
@thedayturns If you mean "if you're fine with including another library" then I agree. It's a very elegant solution, but I don't think it's the majority that wants to include an external library just for one functionality. –  Aske B. Sep 8 '12 at 9:50
    
Yep. Caught my typo after the 5 minute deadline, whoops. –  thedayturns Sep 8 '12 at 20:40

You can use the brace operator to specify the number of times a character must occur:

String []thisCombo2 = thisCombo.split("(?<=\\G.{" + count + "})");

The brace is a handy tool because you can use it to specify either an exact count or ranges.

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+1 Works and great. –  Amit Deshpande Sep 6 '12 at 8:21
    
thanks a lot! works great! –  Emile Beukes Sep 6 '12 at 8:49
    
@EmileBeukes you can always accept it if it works :) –  Amit Deshpande Sep 6 '12 at 8:59

Using Google Guava, you can use Splitter.fixedLength()

Returns a splitter that divides strings into pieces of the given length

Splitter.fixedLength(2).split("abcde");
// returns an iterable containing ["ab", "cd", "e"].
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4  
+1 It always amazes me how concise and elegant Guava is. –  helpermethod Sep 6 '12 at 14:21

If you want to build that regex string you can set the split length as a parameter.

public String getRegex(int splitLength)
{
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < splitLength; i++)
        builder.append(".");

    return "(?<=\\G" + builder.toString() +")";
}
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private String[] StringSpliter(String OriginalString) {
    String newString = "";
    for (String s: OriginalString.split("(?<=\\G.{"nth position"})")) { 
        if(s.length()<3)
            newString += s +"/";
        else
            newString += StringSpliter(s) ;
    }
    return newString.split("/");
}
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