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I have a list of pathnames, some of which are marked with "Include subtree" flag. I need to iterate all the pathes including subtrees, but only once per unique path.

So, if I have such a directory tree:

C:\Models\
C:\Models\A
C:\Models\A\1
C:\Models\B
C:\Models\B\1

and 2 chosen paths with subtree (INPUT):

{"C:\Models\", true}
{"C:\Models\A", true}

I need to avoid the following path duplicates when iterating:

C:\Models\
C:\Models\A
C:\Models\A\1
C:\Models\B
C:\Models\B\1
C:\Models\A   *** Duplicate ***
C:\Models\A\1 *** Duplicate ***

I've decided to use vector + set:

std::vector<std::string> vecPaths;       // For iterating
std::set<std::string>    setUniquePaths; // For duplicates check

but this is memory-ineffective decision, because each path would be presented 2 times 1) in the vector and 2) in the set.

How to provide strings uniqueness without duplicating these strings?

Note on task definition:

  • INPUT is a sequence of pairs {string path, bool includeSubtre}
  • OUTPUT is a vector of paths, a snapshot, intended for future iterating.
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1  
Use set for such things is usual good decision. Also, you can sort and then remove dups. std::list::sort + std::list::unique, or std::sort + std::unique. –  ForEveR Sep 6 '12 at 8:18
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Perhaps a Trie? Eg code.google.com/p/patl –  Remus Rusanu Sep 6 '12 at 8:34
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The way @ForEveR said liveworkspace.org/code/962ff8236d23ff42f9fc8108d323fedd –  fasked Sep 6 '12 at 8:47
    
Does the vector already contain all the paths and you just want to iterate over it or do you want to fill the vector while iterating (using some kind of file system iterator)? In the latter case just drop the vector and use the set alone. In the former case stay with your vector and use a std::set<std::vector<std::string>::iterator> for the duplicates. –  Christian Rau Sep 6 '12 at 8:53
1  
You can iterate over a set so is there even a reason to have the vector in the first place? –  Michael Burr Sep 6 '12 at 8:58
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The comments so far focus mostly on the in-memory datastructures, but it's important to remember that directory traversal is very much IO-limited. Given the input

{"C:\Models\", true}
{"C:\Models\A", true}

you want to skip the entire second directory traversal. Therefore, you do not want to eliminate duplicates at the end. As another example, given

{"C:\Models\A", true}
{"C:\Models\", true}

you want to skip the A subtree during the second enumeration.

Hence, use TWO std::set<std::string> of all known pathnames, one for non-recursively enumerated directories and one for directories that you did enumerate. During recursive enumeration, skip any subtree that's already present in the second set. At the end of the input, you can trivially merge the two sets.

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If you're just going to iterate over the std::vector<std::string> without adding or removing elements (during a single iteration), then why not just use a set of pointers/iterators for the duplicates:

std::vector<std::string> subtreePaths = //the ones you want to iterate for
...
std::set<std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator> setUniquePaths;
for(auto iterS=subtreePaths.begin(); iterS!=subtreePaths.end(); ++iterS)
    for(auto iterP=vecPaths.begin(); iterP!=vecPaths.end(); ++iterP)
        if(matches(*iterP, *iterS) && setUniquePaths.insert(iterP).second)
            std::cout << *iterP << std::endl;    //or whatever

(of course the auto is C++11, feel free to replace it by a corresponding iterator type for C++98/03 compliance).

But maybe I misunderstood what you're actually trying to achieve.


EDIT: If you don't already have all your existing paths in the vecPaths vector and you actually want to somehow iterate over your real file system constructing the vecPaths vector with all the found (and duplicate-cleaned) paths, then my above aproach is of course rubbish, since it assumes a mere string-based iteration over a known vector of all paths.

But if that's the case, you can just drop the vector completely and use a single std::set<std::string> to collect all the paths you encounter (being automatically unique now). No need for an additional vector.

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if I drop the vector completely , will set be iterated alphabetically? –  BlackBada Sep 6 '12 at 9:57
    
I'd better just use set. It really iterates alphabetically source –  BlackBada Sep 6 '12 at 10:14
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@DenisPavlyukov Yes, a std::set is guaranteed to be sorted (usually a binary search tree), in contrast to C++11's std::unordered_set (usually a hash table). But you have to be aware that the order is determined by the underlying character type of the strings, which will most probably sort all lower-case characters before all upper-case characters. But of course you can override this order by supplying a custom ordering predicate to std::set, which by default is just the < operator. –  Christian Rau Sep 6 '12 at 11:18
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If there are a lot of entries, I would build up a vector of all the unique directory names (not paths) and use a tree (e.g http://tree.phi-sci.com/) to store all seen paths via a sequence of IDs into the vector. To determine if an existing directory has already been seen, use a hash map to build a sequence of IDs for each of the directory names in the current path. If the path matches exactly, skip it. If not, add the relevant nodes to the tree to reflect the new path. Note: This may cause multiple nodes in the tree to refer to the same ID.

Here's the code:

std::vector< std::string > directories; // THIS IS THE INPUT!
std::vector< std::string > directory_names;
std::unordered_map< std::string, size_t > name_to_id_map;
tree< size_t > directory_paths;
for (auto idir = directories.begin(); idir != directories.end(); ++idir) {
    // Convert directories to a sequence of IDs (if new names are found, add
    // them to 'directory_names' and 'name_to_id_map'.  This is pretty mechanical code.
    std::vector< size_t > id_sequence = convert( *idir );

    // Walk the tree looking for this ID sequence.
    tree<size_t>::sibling_iterator current_tree_node;
    bool found = true;
    for (auto iid = id_sequence.begin(); iid != id_sequence.end(); ++iid) {
       if ( found ) {
          if ( !directory_paths.is_valid( current_tree_node ) ) {
             // Find a match among the roots of the tree.  Note: There might be a more elegant way to do this.
             tree<size_t>::sibling_iterator iroot( directory_paths.head );
             tree<size_t>::sibling_iterator iroot_end( directory_paths.feet );
             ++iroot_end;

             // Note: If the tree is sorted, we can use equal_range!
             current_tree_node = std::find( iroot, iroot_end, *iid );
             found = ( current_tree_node != iroot_end );
          }
          else {
             // Find a match among the siblings of 'current_tree_node'.
             tree<size_t>::sibling_iterator ichild = directory_paths.begin_child( current_tree_node );
             tree<size_t>::sibling_iterator ichild_end = directory_paths.end_child( current_tree_node );

             // Note: If the tree is sorted, we can use equal_range!
             current_tree_node = std::find( ichild, ichild_end, *iid );
             found = ( current_tree_node != ichild_end );
          }
       }

       if ( !found ) {
          // Add this node to the tree as a child of current_tree_node.
          if ( directory_paths.is_valid( current_tree_node ) ) {
             current_tree_node = directory_paths.insert_after( current_tree_node, *iid );
          }
          else if ( !directory_paths.empty() ) {
             current_tree_node = directory_paths.insert_after( directory_paths.feet, *iid );
          }
          else {
             current_tree_node = directory_paths.set_head( *iid );
          }
       }
    }

    if ( !found ) {
       // This directory path (i.e. *idir) has not been seen before.
       ...
    }
 }

For example, the following input would create 5 unique names (C:, Models, A, 1, B).

C:\Models\
C:\Models\A
C:\Models\A\1
C:\Models\B
C:\Models\B\1

After the first line is processed, the tree would have two nodes. After the 2nd line is processed, the tree would have three nodes. After the 3rd line is processed, the tree would have four nodes. After the 4th line is processed, the tree would have five nodes. After the 5th line is processed, the tree would have six nodes.

If I happened to encounter: C:\Models\1\B, no new entries would be added to 'directory_names' (or 'name_to_id_map'), but the tree would now have eight nodes.

I believe this implementation is very memory efficient since 1) directory_names only stores sub-strings, not the full path and 2) multiple strings are never created for two directories that share a part of the same path. Essentially, as each new directory is processed, only the unique information about the names & path is stored (excluding the overhead of 'name_to_id_map', which seems important to achieve proper run-time vs. memory balance).

Note: I didn't quite understand what you meant by "and 2 chosen paths with subtree (INPUT)".

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I meant that as input you have whole filesystem + list of directories, some of them are marked to proceed subtree. This is the way we allow users to choose list of directories. –  BlackBada Sep 6 '12 at 17:03
    
Any thoughts as to whether this solution is viable? I think it is close to the minimum theoretic memory requirements for representing a directory tree. Generally, people are worried about memory effectiveness only when the input set is really large. –  MarkB Sep 6 '12 at 20:12
    
You're right, it would be better to analyze amount of input data before making any panic about memory. It turned out that in my case I will not have more than 1000 input pathnames. BTW, I'm going to try your decision. –  BlackBada Sep 7 '12 at 13:53
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You can use boost::variant to store a directory nodes. Each node is either a file or a directory:

typedef boost::variant<
      std::string
    , std::map<std::string, boost::recursive_variant_>
    > Tree;

map ensures that there are no duplicate names within a directory.

You may need to add functions to populate and traverse this recursive data structure.

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it would probably work, but I cannot use boost, and I don't know what boost::recursive_variant is –  BlackBada Sep 6 '12 at 10:06
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Use shared_ptr. However string may be implemented as COW, so no need to worry about copies.

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std::string no longer can be COW, since C++11. COW and multi-threading don't get along. –  MSalters Sep 6 '12 at 8:58
    
agreed with @MSalters, I cannot rely on lazy copying. –  BlackBada Sep 6 '12 at 9:17
    
@PropellerMan, I cannot use boost in my project. But if I could, how would std::set<shared_ptr<std::string>> calculate hashcodes for strings? –  BlackBada Sep 6 '12 at 9:20
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@DenisPavlyukov: std::set<T> doesn't use hashcodes. It relies on std::less<T>, which for T==shared_ptr<string> is NOT alphabetical order but memory order. –  MSalters Sep 6 '12 at 9:27
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@DenisPavlyukov: That's the common implementation. More specifically, usually it's a a red-black tree. As far as the standard is concerned, though, anything that keeps a std::set ordered within the specified complexity bounds is OK. W.r.t. alphabetical order, that's slightly tricky as some non-English languages have somewhat different rules. E.g. std::string will sort "ae" after "ad" but in German it's the other way around (since "ae" is equivalent to "ä") –  MSalters Sep 6 '12 at 10:44
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