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I have routes set in AngularJS like this:

$routeProvider
    .when('/dashboard', {templateUrl:'partials/dashboard', controller:widgetsController})
    .when('/lab', {templateUrl:'partials/lab', controller:widgetsController})

I have some links on the topbar styled as tabs. How can I add 'active' class to a tab depending on current template or url?

share|improve this question
    
3  
@AminMeyghani How can this question be duplicate of question, that was asked almost year later? – Regent Oct 10 '14 at 4:34

17 Answers 17

up vote 219 down vote accepted

A way to solve this without having to rely on URLs is to add a custom attribute to every partial during $routeProvider configuration, like this:

$routeProvider.
    when('/dashboard', {
        templateUrl: 'partials/dashboard.html',
        controller: widgetsController,
        activetab: 'dashboard'
    }).
    when('/lab', {
        templateUrl: 'partials/lab.html',
        controller: widgetsController,
        activetab: 'lab'
    });

Expose $route in your controller:

function widgetsController($scope, $route) {
    $scope.$route = $route;
}

Set the active class based on the current active tab:

<li ng-class="{active: $route.current.activetab == 'dashboard'}"></li>
<li ng-class="{active: $route.current.activetab == 'lab'}"></li>
share|improve this answer
3  
this is the best solution I've seen so far because it supports dynamic urls like /foo/:bar. – martinpaulucci Dec 20 '12 at 17:08
2  
i actually haven't been able to get this working. would you be able to provide a plnkr? – PPPaul Mar 7 '13 at 22:44
9  
Just one thing: Better set $scope.activeTab = $route.current.activetab so that you can keep the html a little cleaner. – Christoph Apr 15 '13 at 20:12
2  
This solution didn't work for me in AngularJS 1.2.0rc1. – Amin Ariana Nov 1 '13 at 22:53
2  
This does not work in AngularJS 1.0.8. $route.current is undefined. – Catfish Nov 11 '13 at 5:25

One way of doing this would be by using ngClass directive and the $location service. In your template you could do:

ng-class="{active:isActive('/dashboard')}"

where isActive would be a function in a scope defined like this:

myApp.controller('MyCtrl', function($scope, $location) {
    $scope.isActive = function(route) {
        return route === $location.path();
    }
});

Here is the complete jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/pkozlowski_opensource/KzAfG/

Repeating ng-class="{active:isActive('/dashboard')}" on each navigation tab might be tedious (if you've got many tabs) so this logic might be a candidate for a very simple directive.

share|improve this answer
1  
It took me a long time before I found 'very simple directives' to actually be very simple to write, so I've provided one below. :-) It should be reusable in a variety of contexts, with no non-declarative configuration. – XMLilley Jul 5 '13 at 20:05
1  
Looking at the jsFiddle, how do you set the current page active on page load? The example only works when a user clicks an option. For example, you may want a 'home' nav highlighted when landing on the homepage from an external link. – thathurtabit Oct 14 '13 at 11:06
    
Ahh was scratching my head for a little bit on this. Thanks! – jtsan Jan 4 '15 at 6:54
    
Neat! Thank you! – Bruno Gomes Jan 21 '15 at 18:02
1  
This works, Thanks! – R Jov Jul 9 '15 at 2:31

Following Pavel's advice to use a custom directive, here's a version that requires adding no payload to the routeConfig, is super declarative, and can be adapted to react to any level of the path, by simply changing which slice() of it you're paying attention to.

app.directive('detectActiveTab', function ($location) {
    return {
      link: function postLink(scope, element, attrs) {
        scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccess", function (event, current, previous) {
            /*  
                Designed for full re-usability at any path, any level, by using 
                data from attrs. Declare like this: 
                <li class="nav_tab">
                  <a href="#/home" detect-active-tab="1">HOME</a>
                </li> 
            */

            // This var grabs the tab-level off the attribute, or defaults to 1
            var pathLevel = attrs.detectActiveTab || 1,
            // This var finds what the path is at the level specified
                pathToCheck = $location.path().split('/')[pathLevel] || 
                  "current $location.path doesn't reach this level",
            // This var finds grabs the same level of the href attribute
                tabLink = attrs.href.split('/')[pathLevel] || 
                  "href doesn't include this level";
            // Above, we use the logical 'or' operator to provide a default value
            // in cases where 'undefined' would otherwise be returned.
            // This prevents cases where undefined===undefined, 
            // possibly causing multiple tabs to be 'active'.

            // now compare the two:
            if (pathToCheck === tabLink) {
              element.addClass("active");
            }
            else {
              element.removeClass("active");
            }
        });
      }
    };
  });

We're accomplishing our goals by listening for the $routeChangeSuccess event, rather than by placing a $watch on the path. I labor under the belief that this means the logic should run less often, as I think watches fire on each $digest cycle.

Invoke it by passing your path-level argument on the directive declaration. This specifies what chunk of the current $location.path() you want to match your href attribute against.

<li class="nav_tab"><a href="#/home" detect-active-tab="1">HOME</a></li>

So, if your tabs should react to the base-level of the path, make the argument '1'. Thus, when location.path() is "/home", it will match against the "#/home" in the href. If you have tabs that should react to the second level, or third, or 11th of the path, adjust accordingly. This slicing from 1 or greater will bypass the nefarious '#' in the href, which will live at index 0.

The only requirement is that you invoke on an <a>, as the element is assuming the presence of an href attribute, which it will compare to the current path. However, you could adapt fairly easily to read/write a parent or child element, if you preferred to invoke on the <li> or something. I dig this because you can re-use it in many contexts by simply varying the pathLevel argument. If the depth to read from was assumed in the logic, you'd need multiple versions of the directive to use with multiple parts of the navigation.


EDIT 3/18/14: The solution was inadequately generalized, and would activate if you defined an arg for the value of 'activeTab' that returned undefined against both $location.path(), and the element's href. Because: undefined === undefined. Updated to fix that condition.

While working on that, I realized there should have been a version you can just declare on a parent element, with a template structure like this:

<nav id="header_tabs" find-active-tab="1">
    <a href="#/home" class="nav_tab">HOME</a>
    <a href="#/finance" class="nav_tab">Finance</a>
    <a href="#/hr" class="nav_tab">Human Resources</a>
    <a href="#/quarterly" class="nav_tab">Quarterly</a>
</nav>

Note that this version no longer remotely resembles Bootstrap-style HTML. But, it's more modern and uses fewer elements, so I'm partial to it. This version of the directive, plus the original, are now available on Github as a drop-in module you can just declare as a dependency. I'd be happy to Bower-ize them, if anybody actually uses them.

Also, if you want a bootstrap-compatible version that includes <li>'s, you can go with the angular-ui-bootstrap Tabs module, which I think came out after this original post, and which is perhaps even more declarative than this one. It's less concise for basic stuff, but provides you with some additional options, like disabled tabs and declarative events that fire on activate and deactivate.

share|improve this answer
4  
I couldn't believe no one actually give this a vote ! Here's my 2 cents. Though there's a small mistake in the code, I think the 'tabLevel' is supposed to be 'activeTab'. And for Bootstrap style, you might want to add the 'active' class to the LI element instead of the A element. But this only requires minor change. – DavidLin Jul 19 '13 at 0:51
1  
You are absolutely correct about activeTab, @DavidLin. Edited. But, I'm not in love with Bootstrap's structure, hence a deliberate difference there. In fact, I'm beginning to think that nav abstractions may not belong in ul's at all, and perhaps should just be collections of anchors, wrapped by a nav or other grouping element. Dealing with the intermediary layer of li's is added complexity with no payoff, particularly now that we have the nav element at our disposal to make it clear what's going on. – XMLilley Jul 19 '13 at 18:04
    
This is simple and brilliant. I was surprised there wasn't something like this already in Angular for checking the route that you're on. – Dominic Watson Nov 23 '13 at 16:56
1  
To make it work with bootstrap3, all you have to do is change ` element.addClass("active");` to ` element.parent('li').addClass("active");` I think it could be better named though, something like is-active-tab insead of active-tab which seems to declare the tab is active. Otherwise, this is a seriously nice directive. See this change in the answer by @domi – boatcoder Dec 9 '13 at 5:37
    
Best solution on this page, can't believe it has so little upvotes. – Karolis Jan 7 '14 at 12:50

@rob-juurlink I improved a bit on your solution:

instead of each route needing an active tab; and needing to set the active tab in each controller I do this:

var App = angular.module('App',[]);
App.config(['$routeProvider', function($routeProvider){
  $routeProvider.
  when('/dashboard', {
    templateUrl: 'partials/dashboard.html',
    controller: Ctrl1
  }).
  when('/lab', {
    templateUrl: 'partials/lab.html',
    controller: Ctrl2
  });
}]).run(['$rootScope', '$location', function($rootScope, $location){
   var path = function() { return $location.path();};
   $rootScope.$watch(path, function(newVal, oldVal){
     $rootScope.activetab = newVal;
   });
}]);

And the HTML looks like this. The activetab is just the url that relates to that route. This just removes the need to add code in each controller (dragging in dependencies like $route and $rootScope if this is the only reason they're used)

<ul>
    <li ng-class="{active: activetab=='/dashboard'}">
       <a href="#/dashboard">dashboard</a>
    </li>
    <li ng-class="{active: activetab=='/lab'}">
       <a href="#/lab">lab</a>
    </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for this modification. Very nice. Do you have any suggestions for setting an active tab when the page first loads? – Hairgami_Master Apr 3 '13 at 14:39
1  
depends on what you want. typically you'd have '/' url be your main controller. that way when the user goes to your url, it will load that controller and set that tab as active. In the example above I don't have a '/' url, so if thats your case simply add a .otherwise() $routeProvider. when('/dashboard', { templateUrl: 'partials/dashboard.html', controller: Ctrl1 }). when('/lab', { templateUrl: 'partials/lab.html', controller: Ctrl2 }).otherwise({ redirectTo: '/dashboard' }); best of luck! – Lucas Apr 4 '13 at 10:29
    
Many thanks @Lucas. That helped. Some reason I had to add the # symbol to my main route- when('#/', { controller: FormsController, templateUrl: 'partials/dashboard.html' }). – Hairgami_Master Apr 5 '13 at 20:55
    
I prefer this way. Having a rootScope and do anything in wherever – wrivas Aug 1 '15 at 18:12

Maybe a directive like this is might solve your problem: http://jsfiddle.net/p3ZMR/4/

HTML

<div ng-app="link">
<a href="#/one" active-link="active">One</a>
<a href="#/two" active-link="active">One</a>
<a href="#" active-link="active">home</a>


</div>

JS

angular.module('link', []).
directive('activeLink', ['$location', function(location) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs, controller) {
            var clazz = attrs.activeLink;
            var path = attrs.href;
            path = path.substring(1); //hack because path does bot return including hashbang
            scope.location = location;
            scope.$watch('location.path()', function(newPath) {
                if (path === newPath) {
                    element.addClass(clazz);
                } else {
                    element.removeClass(clazz);
                }
            });
        }

    };

}]);
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that you have to use $observe if the href contains an expression: docs.angularjs.org/guide/directive#Attributes. See updated fiddle: jsfiddle.net/p3ZMR/10 – Narretz Oct 3 '12 at 16:14
1  
both jsfiddle links are broken... – Harmony Proxy Mothibe Jun 18 '15 at 13:29

I recommend using the state.ui module which not only support multiple and nested views but also make this kind of work very easy (code below quoted) :

<ul class="nav">
    <li ng-class="{ active: $state.includes('contacts') }"><a href="#{{$state.href('contacts')}}">Contacts</a></li>
    <li ng-class="{ active: $state.includes('about') }"><a href="#{{$state.href('about')}}">About</a></li>
</ul>

Worth reading.

share|improve this answer
    
Amazing library, thank you for letting us know. – gremo Feb 18 '15 at 13:10

Simplest solution here:

How do I implement the bootstrap navbar active class with Angular JS

Which is:

Use ng-controller to run a single controller outside of the ng-view:

<div class="collapse navbar-collapse" ng-controller="HeaderController">
    <ul class="nav navbar-nav">
        <li ng-class="{ active: isActive('/')}"><a href="/">Home</a></li>
        <li ng-class="{ active: isActive('/dogs')}"><a href="/dogs">Dogs</a></li>
        <li ng-class="{ active: isActive('/cats')}"><a href="/cats">Cats</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>
<div ng-view></div>

and include in controllers.js:

function HeaderController($scope, $location) 
{ 
    $scope.isActive = function (viewLocation) { 
        return viewLocation === $location.path();
    };
}
share|improve this answer
2  
agreed, by far the easiest – AngeloS Jul 11 '14 at 3:50
    
Works perfectly. – chrisvdb Oct 19 '15 at 2:05

Here's another version of XMLillies w/ domi's LI change that uses a search string instead of a path level. I think this is a little more obvious what's happening for my use case.

statsApp.directive('activeTab', function ($location) {
  return {
    link: function postLink(scope, element, attrs) {
      scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccess", function (event, current, previous) {
        if (attrs.href!=undefined) { // this directive is called twice for some reason
          // The activeTab attribute should contain a path search string to match on.
          // I.e. <li><a href="#/nested/section1/partial" activeTab="/section1">First Partial</a></li>
          if ($location.path().indexOf(attrs.activeTab) >= 0) {
            element.parent().addClass("active");//parent to get the <li>
          } else {
            element.parent().removeClass("active");
          }
        }
      });
    }
  };
});

HTML now looks like:

<ul class="nav nav-tabs">
  <li><a href="#/news" active-tab="/news">News</a></li>
  <li><a href="#/some/nested/photos/rawr" active-tab="/photos">Photos</a></li>
  <li><a href="#/contact" active-tab="/contact">Contact</a></li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer

I found XMLilley's anwser the best and most adaptable and non-intrusive.

However I had a small glitch.

For use with bootstrap nav, here is how I modified it:

app.directive('activeTab', function ($location) {
    return {
      link: function postLink(scope, element, attrs) {
        scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccess", function (event, current, previous) {
            /*  designed for full re-usability at any path, any level, by using 
                data from attrs
                declare like this: <li class="nav_tab"><a href="#/home" 
                                   active-tab="1">HOME</a></li> 
            */
            if(attrs.href!=undefined){// this directive is called twice for some reason
                // this var grabs the tab-level off the attribute, or defaults to 1
                var pathLevel = attrs.activeTab || 1,
                // this var finds what the path is at the level specified
                    pathToCheck = $location.path().split('/')[pathLevel],
                // this var finds grabs the same level of the href attribute
                    tabLink = attrs.href.split('/')[pathLevel];
                // now compare the two:
                if (pathToCheck === tabLink) {
                  element.parent().addClass("active");//parent to get the <li>
                }
                else {
                  element.parent().removeClass("active");
                }
            }
        });
      }
    };
  });

I added "if(attrs.href!=undefined)" because this function is apprently called twice, the second time producing an error.

As for the html:

<ul class="nav nav-tabs">
   <li class="active" active-tab="1"><a href="#/accueil" active-tab="1">Accueil</a></li>
   <li><a active-tab="1" href="#/news">News</a></li>
   <li><a active-tab="1" href="#/photos" >Photos</a></li>
   <li><a active-tab="1" href="#/contact">Contact</a></li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
nvm, it was my fault this was called twice. I guess "if(attrs.href!=undefined)" is not needed. – domi Oct 17 '13 at 8:48

You can also simply inject the location into the scope and use that to deduct the style for the navigation:

function IndexController( $scope, $rootScope, $location ) {
  $rootScope.location = $location;
  ...
}

Then use it in your ng-class:

<li ng-class="{active: location.path() == '/search'}">
  <a href="/search">Search><a/>
</li>
share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't it be $root.location.path() in the markup? – Irshu Dec 15 '14 at 4:21
    
@Irshu: That could possibly be cleaner, but the above approach worked for me as well. – Oliver Salzburg Dec 15 '14 at 7:52

Bootstrap example.

If you are using Angulars built in routing (ngview) this directive can be used:

angular.module('myApp').directive('classOnActiveLink', [function() {
    return {
        link: function(scope, element, attrs) {

            var anchorLink = element.children()[0].getAttribute('ng-href') || element.children()[0].getAttribute('href');
            anchorLink = anchorLink.replace(/^#/, '');

            scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccess", function (event, current) {
                if (current.$$route.originalPath == anchorLink) {
                    element.addClass(attrs.classOnActiveLink);
                }
                else {
                    element.removeClass(attrs.classOnActiveLink);
                }
            });

        }
    };
}]);

Assuming your markup looks like this:

    <ul class="nav navbar-nav">
        <li class-on-active-link="active"><a href="/orders">Orders</a></li>
        <li class-on-active-link="active"><a href="/distributors">Distributors</a></li>
    </ul>

I like this was of doing it since you can set the class name you want in your attribute.

share|improve this answer

I agree with Rob's post about having a custom attribute in the controller. Apparently I don't have enough rep to comment. Here's the jsfiddle that was requested:

sample html

<div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
    <ul>
        <li ng-repeat="link in links" ng-class="{active: $route.current.activeNav == link.type}"> <a href="{{link.uri}}">{{link.name}}</a>

        </li>
    </ul>
</div>

sample app.js

angular.module('MyApp', []).config(['$routeProvider', function ($routeProvider) {
    $routeProvider.when('/a', {
        activeNav: 'a'
    })
        .when('/a/:id', {
        activeNav: 'a'
    })
        .when('/b', {
        activeNav: 'b'
    })
        .when('/c', {
        activeNav: 'c'
    });
}])
    .controller('MyCtrl', function ($scope, $route) {
    $scope.$route = $route;
    $scope.links = [{
        uri: '#/a',
        name: 'A',
        type: 'a'
    }, {
        uri: '#/b',
        name: 'B',
        type: 'b'
    }, {
        uri: '#/c',
        name: 'C',
        type: 'c'
    }, {
        uri: '#/a/detail',
        name: 'A Detail',
        type: 'a'
    }];
});

http://jsfiddle.net/HrdR6/

share|improve this answer
    
I like the data-driven approach to the list of links. And, some may choose to move the array of links into a service/factory. – Grant Lindsay May 5 '15 at 21:17

an alternative way is to use ui-sref-active

A directive working alongside ui-sref to add classes to an element when the related ui-sref directive's state is active, and removing them when it is inactive. The primary use-case is to simplify the special appearance of navigation menus relying on ui-sref, by having the "active" state's menu button appear different, distinguishing it from the inactive menu items.

Usage:

ui-sref-active='class1 class2 class3' - classes "class1", "class2", and "class3" are each added to the directive element when the related ui-sref's state is active, and removed when it is inactive.

Example:
Given the following template,

<ul>
  <li ui-sref-active="active" class="item">
    <a href ui-sref="app.user({user: 'bilbobaggins'})">@bilbobaggins</a>
  </li>
  <!-- ... -->
</ul>

when the app state is "app.user", and contains the state parameter "user" with value "bilbobaggins", the resulting HTML will appear as

<ul>
  <li ui-sref-active="active" class="item active">
    <a ui-sref="app.user({user: 'bilbobaggins'})" href="/users/bilbobaggins">@bilbobaggins</a>
  </li>
  <!-- ... -->
</ul>

The class name is interpolated once during the directives link time (any further changes to the interpolated value are ignored). Multiple classes may be specified in a space-separated format.

Use ui-sref-opts directive to pass options to $state.go(). Example:

<a ui-sref="home" ui-sref-opts="{reload: true}">Home</a>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It is really useful when working in ionic framework! – Avijit Gupta Feb 5 at 9:29

I needed a solution that doesn't require changes to controllers, because for some pages we only render templates and there's no controller at all. Thanks to previous commenters who suggested using $routeChangeSuccess I came up with something like this:

# Directive
angular.module('myapp.directives')
.directive 'ActiveTab', ($route) ->
  restrict: 'A'

  link: (scope, element, attrs) ->
    klass = "active"

    if $route.current.activeTab? and attrs.flActiveLink is $route.current.activeTab
      element.addClass(klass)

    scope.$on '$routeChangeSuccess', (event, current) ->
      if current.activeTab? and attrs.flActiveLink is current.activeTab
        element.addClass(klass)
      else
        element.removeClass(klass)

# Routing
$routeProvider
.when "/page",
  templateUrl: "page.html"
  activeTab: "page"
.when "/other_page",
  templateUrl: "other_page.html"
  controller: "OtherPageCtrl"
  activeTab: "other_page"

# View (.jade)
a(ng-href='/page', active-tab='page') Page
a(ng-href='/other_page', active-tab='other_page') Other page

It doesn't depend on URLs and thus it's really easy to set it up for any sub pages etc.

share|improve this answer
'use strict';

angular.module('cloudApp')
  .controller('MenuController', function ($scope, $location, CloudAuth) {
    $scope.menu = [
      {
        'title': 'Dashboard',
        'iconClass': 'fa fa-dashboard',
        'link': '/dashboard',
        'active': true
      },
      {
        'title': 'Devices',
        'iconClass': 'fa fa-star',
        'link': '/devices'
      },
      {
        'title': 'Settings',
        'iconClass': 'fa fa-gears',
        'link': '/settings'
      }
    ];
    $location.path('/dashboard');
    $scope.isLoggedIn = CloudAuth.isLoggedIn;
    $scope.isAdmin = CloudAuth.isAdmin;
    $scope.isActive = function(route) {
      return route === $location.path();
    };
  });

And use the below in the template:

<li role="presentation" ng-class="{active:isActive(menuItem.link)}" ng-repeat="menuItem in menu"><a href="{{menuItem.link}}"><i class="{{menuItem.iconClass}}"></i>&nbsp;&nbsp;{{menuItem.title}}</a></li>
share|improve this answer

I can't remember where I found this method, but it's pretty simple and works well.

HTML:

<nav role="navigation">
    <ul>
        <li ui-sref-active="selected" class="inactive"><a ui-sref="tab-01">Tab 01</a></li> 
        <li ui-sref-active="selected" class="inactive"><a ui-sref="tab-02">Tab 02</a></li>
    </ul>
</nav>

CSS:

  .selected {
    background-color: $white;
    color: $light-blue;
    text-decoration: none;
    border-color: $light-grey;
  } 
share|improve this answer

Came here for solution .. though above solutions are working fine but found them little bit complex unnecessary. For people who still looking for a easy and neat solution, it will do the task perfectly.

<section ng-init="tab=1">
                <ul class="nav nav-tabs">
                    <li ng-class="{active: tab == 1}"><a ng-click="tab=1" href="#showitem">View Inventory</a></li>
                    <li ng-class="{active: tab == 2}"><a ng-click="tab=2" href="#additem">Add new item</a></li>
                    <li ng-class="{active: tab == 3}"><a ng-click="tab=3" href="#solditem">Sold item</a></li>
                </ul>
            </section>
share|improve this answer
    
doesn't work when navigated to by url – shuckc Sep 23 '15 at 18:05

protected by Pankaj Parkar Oct 8 '15 at 21:20

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