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I am working on unix. I want to knwo the current cpu usage of a process. I understood that ps give the average of cpu used till the process is up - it is not the current usage.

Is there a way to print only the cpu from the top command without 10 more parameters and headers? I know how to do it with awk - this is not the way i want to do it.

top  -p 20705 -bc -n 1  | tail -n 2 | awk '{ print $9}' | head -n 1

If there is another simple way to do it, not reading /proc/stat...

If there is a simple way doing it from c++, it is also ok.

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Why don't you want to read /proc/stat... ? –  Jan Spurny Sep 6 '12 at 9:01
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As far as I know there is no standard command which can do this directly. –  scai Sep 6 '12 at 10:40
    
AFAIK, the percentage shown in top is the percentage of time that the scheduler scheduled that process to be run. It is not the percentage of the cpu being used. Maybe that's splitting hairs, but I thought it was worth mentioning. Although they are most likely very similar, I can think of cases where they might be different. –  Homer6 Aug 24 '13 at 21:42

2 Answers 2

Most likely, you will need to read /proc/stat, However, here is an interesting article with C code that may help you out. To understand and use the output from the program you should do man 5 proc. And here is the source code.

The bottom line is that you will need to read from /proc/stat to do what you want.

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to see cpu usage of a proccess whose pid is 24556

ps -p 24556 -o \%cpu=

to see mem usage of a process named syslogd

ps -C syslogd -o \%mem=
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I understood that ps give the average of cpu used till the process is up - it is not the current usage. –  davidbobo Sep 6 '12 at 9:38

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