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I am fairly new to PHP. I have a function which checks the cost of price. I want to return the variable from this function to be used globally:

<?
function getDeliveryPrice($qew){
    if ($qew=="1"){
        $deliveryPrice="60";
    } else {
        $deliveryPrice="20";
    }
    return $deliveryPrice;                          
}
// Assuming these two next lines are on external pages..
getDeliveryPrice(12);
echo $deliveryPrice; // It should return 20

?>
share|improve this question
    
@M1th I wish there was some downvote on comments for fanboy mantra. –  TheBlackBenzKid Sep 6 '12 at 9:11
    
@TheBlackBenzKid: There is: flagging comments for moderator attention. Already did so, will be gone in a little while. –  Jon Sep 6 '12 at 9:12
1  
@TheBlackBenzKid Just flag it. –  Fluffeh Sep 6 '12 at 9:12
    
Thanks. I have flagged. Surely I asked in the correct manor so why the OMG so newb attitude. –  TheBlackBenzKid Sep 6 '12 at 9:13
1  
@TheBlackBenzKid Remember, this is the internet. For every polite, helpful and friendly person there are hundreds of the opposite. SO is pretty good at weeding out the folks we don't want but it is sort of whack-a-mole :) –  Fluffeh Sep 6 '12 at 9:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You should simply store the return value in a variable:

$deliveryPrice = getDeliveryPrice(12);
echo $deliveryPrice; // will print 20

The $deliveryPrice variable above is a different variable than the $deliveryPrice inside the function. The latter is not visible outside the function because of variable scope.

share|improve this answer
    
Also worth mentioning that in the comparison it is being checked against a string value perhaps? –  Fluffeh Sep 6 '12 at 9:10
    
@Fluffeh: Eh... no practical difference. I wouldn't mention that to a beginner. –  Jon Sep 6 '12 at 9:11
    
Is there somehow I can say returnAsGlobal $deliveryPrice; –  TheBlackBenzKid Sep 6 '12 at 9:11
1  
@TheBlackBenzKid: There is, but that's one of the worst practices available to you and it's only "global or nothing" -- there is no option to say "make this available to the caller" if the calling code is not in the global scope. Take my advice and do not go there. There is also the possibility of the function accepting an "out parameter" by reference but again: this is not how that feature should be used. –  Jon Sep 6 '12 at 9:13
<?
function getDeliveryPrice($qew){
    if ($qew=="1"){
        $deliveryPrice="60";
    } else {
        $deliveryPrice="20";
    }
    return $deliveryPrice;                          
}

$price = getDeliveryPrice(12);
echo $price;

?>
share|improve this answer
<?php
function getDeliveryPrice($qew){
   global $deliveryPrice;
    if ($qew=="1"){
        $deliveryPrice="60";
    } else {
        $deliveryPrice="20";
    }
    //return $deliveryPrice;                          
}
// Assuming these two next lines are on external pages..
getDeliveryPrice(12);
echo $deliveryPrice; // It should return 20

?>
share|improve this answer
    
nalla answer... –  prajul Apr 4 '13 at 16:39
    
@prajul enna upvote idu –  Mansoorkhan Cherupuzha Apr 8 '13 at 4:04

As some alrady said, try using classes for this.

<?php

class myClass {

    private $delivery_price;

    public function setDeliveryPrice( $qew = 0 ) {
        if ( $qew == "1" ) {
            $this -> delivery_price = "60";
        } else {
            $this -> delivery_price = "20";
        }
    }

    public function getDeliveryPrice() {
        return $this -> delivery_price;
    }

}

?>

Now, to use it, just initialize the class and do what you need:

<?php

    $myClass = new myClass();
    $myClass -> setDeliveryPrice( 1 );

    echo $myClass -> getDeliveryPrice();

?>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for OOP example. –  TheBlackBenzKid Sep 6 '12 at 10:38

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