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I have two apps, both use integrated security. One works with the values set to true in the connection string and another with the value set to SSPI.

Why is the difference, as I knew about SSPI but not using True?

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The accepted answer is not the best one, its not fully correct either. Integrated Security = True or SSPI are not same. Integrated Security=true; doesn't work in all SQL providers, it throws an exception when used with the OleDb provider. So basically Integrated Security=SSPI; is preferred since works with both SQLClient & OleDB provider. I have added an answer for better clarification. –  Pranav Singh Jul 9 at 10:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 161 down vote accepted

According to Microsoft they are the same thing.

When false, User ID and Password are specified in the connection. When true, the current Windows account credentials are used for authentication.
Recognized values are true, false, yes, no, and sspi (strongly recommended), which is equivalent to true.

There however is a difference between them according to the comment bellow:

True ignores User Id and Password if provided and uses those of the running process, SSPI it will use them if provided which is why MS prefers this.
They are equivalent in that they use the same security mechanism to authenticate but that is it.

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10  
Originally, I think there was a difference in that "True" used NTLM and "SSPI" used Kerberos, but they're now interchangeable. –  SqlRyan Aug 4 '09 at 20:26
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Actually they are not the same or interchangeable, Microsoft says they are equivalent but that doesn't mean interchangeable or that they are the same thing. TRUE ignores user Id and password if provided and uses those of the running process, SSPI it will use them if provided which is why MS prefers this. They are equivalent in that they use the same security mechanism to authenticate but that is it. –  Rodney Foley Apr 15 '11 at 15:23
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Didn't check last comment, but if true, should be as answer, but not the comment –  Johnny_D Mar 29 '12 at 12:12
2  
@RodneyFoley I use SSPI with wrong username and password, but it doesnt care and connected successfully in net4.0. Is this expected result ? –  Ryu Kaplan Jun 6 '12 at 8:36
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@RodneyFoley sorry, my tests confirm that this answer is correct and your comment is not. Maybe it worked that way once, but it doesn't now, and you can't provide any reference to a Microsoft doc that supports your opinion. –  Kirk Broadhurst Sep 17 '12 at 6:48

Using Windows Authentication

To connect to the database server is recommended to use Windows Authentication, commonly known as integrated security. To specify the Windows authentication, you can use any of the following two key-value pairs with the data provider. NET Framework for SQL Server:

 Integrated Security = true;
 Integrated Security = SSPI;

However, only the second works with the data provider .NET Framework OleDb. If you set Integrated Security = true for ConnectionString an exception is thrown.

To specify the Windows authentication in the data provider. NET Framework for ODBC, you should use the following key-value pair.

Trusted_Connection = yes;

Source: MSDN: Working with Connection Strings

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Integrated Security = False : User ID and Password are specified in the connection. Integrated Security = true : the current Windows account credentials are used for authentication.

Integrated Security = SSPI : this is equivalant to true.

We can avoid the username and password attributes from the connection string and use the Integrated Security

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Let me start with Integrated Security = false

false User ID and Password are specified in the connection string.
true Windows account credentials are used for authentication.

Recognized values are true, false, yes, no, and SSPI.

If User ID and Password are specified and Integrated Security is set to true, then User ID and Password will be ignored and Integrated Security will be used

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Many questions get answers if we use .Net Reflector to se the actual code of SqlConnection :) true and sspi are the same:

internal class DbConnectionOptions

...
internal bool ConvertValueToIntegratedSecurityInternal(string stringValue)
{
    if ((CompareInsensitiveInvariant(stringValue, "sspi") || CompareInsensitiveInvariant(stringValue, "true")) || CompareInsensitiveInvariant(stringValue, "yes"))
    {
        return true;
    }
...
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Note that connection strings are specific to what and how you are connecting to data. These are connecting to the same database but the first is using .NET Framework Data Provider for SQL Server. Integrated Security=True will not work for OleDb.

  • Data Source=.;Initial Catalog=aspnetdb;Integrated Security=True
  • Provider=SQLOLEDB;Data Source=.;Integrated Security=SSPI;Initial Catalog=aspnetdb

When in doubt use the Visual Studio Server Explorer Data Connections.

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+1 for informative msdn link. –  Pranav Singh May 13 at 16:46

Integrated Security=true; doesn't work in all SQL providers, it throws an exception when used with the OleDb provider.

So basically Integrated Security=SSPI; is preferred since works with both SQLClient & OleDB provider.

Other options are: enter image description here

for more information refer : Connection String Syntax (ADO.NET)

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