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I have a function Static1Url in a .cs which does a job of pre-pending a URL string:

namespace Website2012
{
    public static class GlobalSiteFunctions
    {

        /// <summary>Returns a formatted URL mapping to Static1 on a CDN.</summary>
        /// <param name="url">The URL to be formatted.</param>
        /// <returns>Formatted string.</returns>
        public static string Static1Url(string url)
        {
            return string.Format("{0}{1}", ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Static1CDNUrl"], url);
        }
    }
}

I'd like to be able to access this from an aspx page like so:

<p>This is the complete URL: <%= Static1Url("my-file-name.jpg") %></p>

At the moment, to be able to do this I must use the following code:

<p>This is the complete URL: <%= Website2012.GlobalSiteFunctions.Static1Url("my-file-name.jpg") %></p>

If I add an Import statement at the top of the page (<%@ Import Namespace="Website2012" %>) then I can now use the following:

<p>This is the complete URL: <%= GlobalSiteFunctions.Static1Url("my-file-name.jpg") %></p>

Call me lazy but I'd prefer an even simpler solution, preferably one that didn't involve an Import at the top of the page but then didn't mean I had to use a lengthy function call. Is this possible?

EDIT (For the benefit of Imran Balouch)

I have come up with this idea for handling multiple page types, is this good practice:

public class MyPage : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    public static bool Test()
    {
        return Functions.Test();
    }
}

public class MyUserControl : System.Web.UI.UserControl
{
    public static bool Test()
    {
        return Functions.Test();
    }
}


private class Functions
{
    public static bool Test()
    {
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
lolz, the start of your edit says, "EDIT (For the benefit of Imran Balouch)", its not for my benefit :D –  Imran Balouch Sep 6 '12 at 9:56
    
I wouldn't say this is good practice at all. Re-usable functions should be kept separately in a class library which means you can use them anywhere. The second answer from @Habib is a much cleaner solution. –  tristankoffee Sep 17 '12 at 10:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution for this that can come in my mind is override the Page Class and in that overridden Page Class, write down your function and inherit every page of yours from the derived class, this way you can use it without using the import statement.

public class MyPage : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    protected string Static1Url(string url)
    {
        return string.Format("{0}{1}", ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Static1CDNUrl"], url);
    }
}

than your page must be like:

public partial class YourPage : MyPage
{

}

and you can use it like:

<p>This is the complete URL: <%= base.Static1Url("my-file-name.jpg") %></p>
share|improve this answer
    
modified a little bit to add the last <p> tag. –  Imran Balouch Sep 6 '12 at 9:35
    
I do kind of like this. I've just tried it and it works quite nicely. One problem, I will be calling the function from both aspx files and ascx files, how would I go about handling this? I'll modify my OP to show what I've come up with. –  Chris Sep 6 '12 at 9:41
    
One solution to this can be overriding the UserControl class as: public class MyUserControl: System.Web.UI.UserControl and than inheriting your user controls from this class and in this case you will have two copies of same method. –  Imran Balouch Sep 6 '12 at 9:50

No its not. You need the class name atleast to access the static method (if you include the namespace above). If you don't include the namespace then you have to access it via the namespace like in your example.

Website2012.GlobalSiteFunctions.Static1Url
share|improve this answer

I think the answer is 'Yes' and 'No' depending on exactly what you are really wanting. I have 2 considerations. I recommend against the first in the situation that is presented in the question, but this is useful for very similar situations and this 1st option does more directly answer the question as asked but I believe the 2nd is a better answer as to what I believe is really desired.

1: You can use an extension method on the System.Web.UI.Page so you can call your method by: this.Static1Url(...). Your extension method would look something like this:

public static string Static1Url(this System.Web.UI.Page p, string url)
{   return string.Format("{0}{1}", ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Static1CDNUrl"], url);
}

But because you don't use that variable p in your method, and it's really not an intended use of an extension method, I recommend against this usage. I wud call this kind of use 'slop'. But a good method that I use this for is this extension method:

    public static string RequestFQ(this System.Web.UI.Page p, string key, string valueForNullResult = "?")
    {   string v = p.Request.Form[key] ?? p.Request.QueryString[key];
        if (v == valueForNullResult) { v = null; }
        return v;
    } // public string RequestFQ(this System.Web.UI.Page p, string key, string valueForNullResult = "?")

The Request collection needs the Page instance, so this example is quite applicable. And calling it is simple from inside a web page: this.RequestFQ("myKey");.

Now for what I think is your best solution:

2: It seems to me that your real question is you making your call a shorter name so you don't have all your lengthy 'GlobalSiteFunctions.Static1Url()'. I remind you (or enlighten you to the fact) that a using statement can rename your long class name so Website2012.GlobalSiteFunctions.Static1Url(...) can be called with g.Static1Url(...) with a using statement such as using g = Website2012.GlobalSiteFunctions;.

So your questions specifically asks whether you can avoid the OOP design, and technically, no, you cannot. But you can shorten the length of characters you need to use to call your method by this 2nd option I provide. It seems to me that this is really what you are wanting.

Happy coding!

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