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Why does PHP return INF (infinity) for the following piece of code:

<?php
$n = 1234;
$m = 0;

while ($n > 0)
{
    $m = ($m * 10) + ($n % 10);
    $n = $n / 10;
}

var_dump($m);
?>

The expected result was 4321, but PHP returned INF, float type:

float INF

I wrote the same code in Python and C# and got the expected output - 4321

Python

n = 1234
m = 0

while (n > 0):
    m = (m * 10) + (n % 10)
    n = n / 10

print m

C#

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int n = 1234;
    int m = 0;

    while (n > 0)
    {
        m = (m * 10) + (n % 10);
        n = n / 10;
    }

    Console.WriteLine(m);
    Console.ReadLine();
}
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I don't know exactly why, but it returns INF because the number becomes to big. If you alter the test to $n > 1 it returns the expected result… –  feeela Sep 6 '12 at 10:22
3  
try: $n = (int)($n / 10); –  Yoshi Sep 6 '12 at 10:24
1  
As an aside, Python 3 moved integer division to the // operator and made / into regular floating point division, so Python 3 will return inf just like PHP does. –  Kevin Sep 6 '12 at 16:23
    
@Kevin Very interesting, thanks for pointing that out. I was using 2.7 –  spidEY Sep 6 '12 at 16:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

In php $n / 10 will return a float number, not integer.

So $n > 0 will always be true.

Change while($n > 0)

to while($n > 1) or while((int)$n > 0), then you will get the right result.

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PHP is typeless and converts 'on the fly'.

That means, you $n will never be '0' or lower, because $n will be a 'float', when needed.

Try checking for < 1, and you should be fine.

Just to clarify this, $n will behave like this:

$n = 1234 $n = 123.4 $n = 12.34 $n = 1.234 $n = 0.1234 $n = 0.01234 etc.

Meaning: $n will always approach 0, but never reach it. That makes $m infinite, since the loop itself is infinite.

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What is happening is that:

$n = $n / 10;

Is performing float division instead of integer division, thus $n never reaches a value of 0, it just approaches a value of 0, i.e. 0.0...1234.

Changing the above code to this:

$n = (int)($n / 10);

Will fix the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Casting it to integer gives the following result: int 43210 –  spidEY Sep 6 '12 at 10:29
    
That was not what I was expecting, I am afraid I don't quite know why it gives you that at the moment.. –  Marius Sep 6 '12 at 10:36
2  
Casting operators have precedence above arithmetic operators, so you're only casting the $n variable, and not the result of the division. PHP operator precedence –  Ivar Bonsaksen Sep 6 '12 at 10:43
1  
@Ivar Bonsaksen Indeed, adding brackets around $n / 10 casts it as expected. –  spidEY Sep 6 '12 at 10:44
    
@IvarBonsaksen Thank you for clearing that up! –  Marius Sep 6 '12 at 11:00

the correct algoritm uses floor()

<?php
$n = 1234;
$m = 0;

while ($n > 0)
{
    $m = $m * 10 + ($n % 10);
    $n = floor($n / 10);
}

var_dump($m);
share|improve this answer

It is more that likely because of typical floating point arithmetic.

If you use BCMath Arbitrary Precision Mathematics it does not have the same effect.

$n = 1234;
$m = 0;

while ($n > 0)
{
    $m = bcmul($m, 10) + bcmod($n, 10);
    $n = bcdiv($n, 10);
}

var_dump($m);

http://codepad.viper-7.com/FYNCyN

See also:

http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.float.php

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$n = intval($n / 10);

That seems to have solved the problem.

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