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I need a good way to close SQLIte connections in Java. After a few suggestion by other users I decided to add to my code a finally block to be sure that closing operation are always executed.

public static boolean executeQuery(String query)
{

    Connection conn = null;
    Statement stmt = null;

    try
    {
        Class.forName("org.sqlite.JDBC");
        conn = DriverManager.getConnection(Global.dbPath);
        stmt = conn.createStatement();
        stmt.execute(query);
        return true;   
    }
    catch(ClassNotFoundException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e);
        return false;
    }
    catch(SQLException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e);
        return false;
    }
    finally
    {
        try 
        { 
            stmt.close();
            conn.close();
            return true;
        } 
        catch (SQLException ex) 
        {
            System.out.println ("Errore closing connections");
            return false;
        }
    }
}

I'm not sure that this is the best solution.

How can I optimize this for readability?

share|improve this question
    
To minimize the number of lines of code and to improve the readability of the code –  Luca Sep 6 '12 at 12:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A few comments; nutshells:

  • Separate the SQL exceptions from the reflection exception.
  • Are your SQL exceptions recoverable? If not, throw an app-specific RuntimeException.
  • Wrap up the connection and statement close exceptions in a utility method, yours or a 3rd party's.
  • Don't short-change exception handling; dump the stack trace.

This leads to the following:

public static boolean executeQuery(String query) {
    try {
        Class.forName("org.sqlite.JDBC");
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        throw new DbException("Could not find JDBC driver", e);
    }

    Connection conn = null;
    Statement stmt = null;

    try {
        conn = DriverManager.getConnection(Global.dbPath);
        stmt = conn.createStatement();
        stmt.execute(query);
        return true;
    } catch(SQLException e) {
        throw new DbException("Exception during statement execution", e);
    } finally {
        DbUtils.closeQuietly(conn);
        DbUtils.closeQuietly(stmt);
    }
}

(I'm using Apache Commons' DbUtils for its closeQuietly, it checks for null (yours didn't). Your own version might throw an app-specific exception as I do here with DbException. This wraps up all your DB-related exceptions into a single exception class, which may or may not be what you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Really helpful. do you raccomand to use Apache Commons 'DbUtils? or simply create my own class to do that? thanks! –  Luca Sep 6 '12 at 16:06
    
Another question. I used your code but the compiler gives me a "missing return statement" exception. Probably I need to put a return statement at the end of the method outside all other block? thanks! –  Luca Sep 6 '12 at 16:56
    
@Luca You shouldn't needed an additional return, all paths either return our throw an exception. I don't think it matters if you write your own or not, but if you want the closes to throw your exception, you'd need to write your own. –  Dave Newton Sep 6 '12 at 18:48

If you want to make sure a command is executed you have to put it alone into a try catch block:

    try { 
        stmt.close();
    } 
    catch (Exception ex) {
    }

    try { 
        conn.close();
    } 
    catch (Exception ex) {
        System.out.println ("Error closing connections");
        return false;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Ok. Thanks. So in my code the best way to do that is to use the code you posted in my finally block? thanks! –  Luca Sep 6 '12 at 11:37
    
The essential of my answer is: Don't put more than one command in a try-catch block if you want to execute the all. Because in case of an exception not every command will be executed. –  Robert Sep 6 '12 at 13:20

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