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I am a beginner trying to learn c++ so probably my question is very basic. Consider the following pice of code:

class pounds
{
private:
    int m_p;
    int m_cents;
public:
    pounds(){m_p = 0; m_cents= 0;}
    pounds(int p, int cents) 
{
    m_p = p;
    m_cents = cents;
}

friend ostream& operator << (ostream&, pounds&);
friend istream& operator>>(istream&, pounds&);

};

ostream& operator<< (ostream& op, pounds& p)
{
    op<<p.m_p<<"and "<<p.m_cents<<endl;
    return op;
}

istream& operator>>(istream& ip, pounds& p)
{
    ip>>p.m_p>>p.m_cents;
    return ip;
}

This compiles and seems to work but I am not returning a reference to a local variable? Thanks in advance.

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4  
No, the reference is already in the parameters and references something outside of the function, so everything is fine. –  Xeo Sep 6 '12 at 10:50
2  
References themselves are not objects. Whether or not you're returning a reference to a local depends on what the original reference refers to. In your case it's ok, since op and ip refer to objects from the call site. –  jrok Sep 6 '12 at 10:56
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1 Answer 1

It's correct, since there are no local variables, there are references, that will be passed, when operators will be called.

And i suggest you to change signature of operator << to

std::ostream& operator << (ostream& os, const pounds& p);

since, p is not modified in function.

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Thanks a lot ForEveR, I think I understand now. –  angry_pacifist Sep 6 '12 at 14:28
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