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We read values from a set of sensors, occasionally a reading or two is lost for a particular sensor , so now and again I run a query to see if all sensors have the same record count.

GROUP BY sensor_id HAVING COUNT(*) != xxx;

So I run a query once to visually get a value of xxx and then run it again to see if any vary.

But is there any clever way of doing this automatically in a single query?

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2 Answers

You could do:

HAVING COUNT(*) != (SELECT MAX(count) FROM (
  SELECT COUNT(*) AS count FROM my_table GROUP BY sensor_id
) t)

Or else group again by the count in each group (and ignore the first result):

SELECT count, GROUP_CONCAT(sensor_id) AS sensors
FROM (
  SELECT sensor_id, COUNT(*) AS count FROM my_table GROUP BY sensor_id
) t
GROUP BY count
ORDER BY count DESC
LIMIT    1, 18446744073709551615
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Won't group_concat just provide a huge string that will be less easy to read then a properly ordered result as in my first query? –  mrmryb Sep 6 '12 at 11:07
    
@mrmryb: Hence the first option in my revised answer. –  eggyal Sep 6 '12 at 11:30
    
It works, but it will still give a very unfriendly string if you have thousands upon thousands of results all with diff counts and in no particular order: Your Fiddle –  mrmryb Sep 6 '12 at 12:27
    
@mrmryb: You misunderstand the first option in my revised answer. It was not intended to be used in conjunction with the second option. It is merely a drop-in replacement for the HAVING clause that the OP was originally using: sqlfiddle. –  eggyal Sep 6 '12 at 13:28
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SELECT sensor_id,COUNT(*) AS count
FROM table
GROUP BY sensor_id
ORDER BY count

Will show a list of the sensor_id along with a count of all the records it has, you can then manually check to see if any vary.

SELECT * FROM (
SELECT sensor_id,COUNT(*) AS count
FROM table
GROUP BY sensor_id
) AS t1
GROUP BY count 

Will show all the counts that vary, but the group by will lose information about which sensor_ids have which counts.

---EDIT---

Taken a bit from both mine and eggyal's answer and created this, for the count that is most frequent I call the id default, and then for any values that stand out I have given them separate rows. This way you maintain the readability of a table if you have many results Multi Row, but also have a simple one row column if all counts are the same One Row. If however you are happy with the concocted strings then go with eggyal's answer. Might be a bit over the top but here goes:

select 'default' as id,t5.c1 as count from(
select id,count(*) as c1 from your_table group by id having count(*)=
(select t4.count from
(
select max(t3.count2) as max,t3.count as count from 
(
select count(*) as count2,t2.count from
(
  SELECT id,COUNT(*) AS count
  FROM your_table
  GROUP BY id
) as t2 
  GROUP BY count
) as t3
) as t4)) as t5 group by count
union all
select t5.id as id,t5.c1 as count from(
select id,count(*) as c1 from your_table group by id having count(*)<>
(select t4.count from
(
select max(t3.count2) as max,t3.count as count from 
(
select count(*) as count2,t2.count from
(
  SELECT id,COUNT(*) AS count
  FROM your_table
  GROUP BY id
) as t2 
  GROUP BY count
) as t3
) as t4)) as t5
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Manually check? What if there are thousands of sensors? –  eggyal Sep 6 '12 at 10:54
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