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What I'd like to achieve is a layout like this

some label  [ ] checkbox 1
            [ ] checkbox 2
            [ ] checkbox 3
            [ ] checkbox 4

[ ] represents a checkbox

What markup and CSS would be best to use for this? I know this would be easy to do with a table I'm wondering if this is possible with divs

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1  
A table is perfectly OK for layiing out tabular elements like this. –  Robert Harvey Aug 4 '09 at 20:53
10  
Tables are for tabular data. This isn't tabular data, it's a set of form elements with a label. –  Magnar Aug 4 '09 at 20:56
2  
Not trying to antagonize here, but the OP did say "I know this would be easy to do with a table..." I'm not sure what value was being added with a <table>-based response. –  Sean Bright Aug 4 '09 at 21:06
1  
Tables aren't evil, but they're used for the wrong reasons more often than not. They make for bigger html-files (bad for performance and bandwidth), usually with a more cluttered html-structure (bad for maintainability). As for tabular data however, they are excellent. –  Magnar Aug 4 '09 at 21:07
3  
Tables aren't evil, they make wonderful tables. –  kmiyashiro Aug 4 '09 at 21:41

4 Answers 4

I would use this markup:

<div id="checkboxes">
  <label>some label</label>
  <ul>
    <li><input type="checkbox"> checkbox 1</li>
    <li><input type="checkbox"> checkbox 2</li>
    <li><input type="checkbox"> checkbox 3</li>
    <li><input type="checkbox"> checkbox 4</li>
  </ul>
</div>

and these styles:

#checkboxes label {
  float: left;
}
#checkboxes ul {
  margin: 0;
  list-style: none;
  float: left;
}

Tables aren't evil, but they're used for the wrong reasons more often than not. They make for bigger html-files (bad for performance and bandwidth), usually with a more cluttered html-structure (bad for maintainability). As for tabular data however, they are excellent.

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I agree, but don't forget the 'for' and 'id': <label for="somethingHere">...</label> and <ul id="somethingHere"> –  Justin Lucente Aug 4 '09 at 21:10
    
@Jusin: There's supposed to be one label for each checkbox, if I'm understanding the specs correctly. –  You Aug 4 '09 at 21:54
1  
I suppose that using a label element would actually not be the correct thing since technically a label should belong to an input element whereas here it would belong to the unordered list. But since the form would probably contain more input elements (not all of which will be lists of checkboxes) it probably makes sense to use a label anyway for simplicity purposes. Else the same styles that are applied to the other labels would have to be applied to the span or whatever other element would be used instead of label –  MarcS Aug 4 '09 at 21:58
1  
@MarcS: see You's answer for proper markup. Replace the div with a fieldset, replace the label with a legend and add some labels to all inputs. legend (or rather: fieldset) defines a one-to-may relationship, and lable defines a one-to-one relationship. –  cic Aug 4 '09 at 22:12
    
Excellent feedback! If you're using YUI's reset.css, then legend is rather nice. For this simple example, I think the css necessary to cancel out all the default stylings distracts too much from the solution. –  Magnar Aug 5 '09 at 5:07

This very semantic HTML:

<fieldset class="checkboxgroup">
    <p>some label</p>
    <label><input type="checkbox"> checkbox 1</label>
    <label><input type="checkbox"> checkbox 2</label>
    <label><input type="checkbox"> checkbox 3</label>
    <label><input type="checkbox"> checkbox 4</label>
</fieldset>

And this fairly simple CSS:

.checkboxgroup{
    width: 20em;
    overflow: auto;
}
.checkboxgroup p{
    width: 7em;
    text-align: right;
}
.checkboxgroup label{
    width: 12em;
    float: right;
}

Adjust widths as needed.

The proper way to do this really is to replace the p element in my HTML with a legend element, but this won't style the way you want it to without some pretty ugly CSS.

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1  
+1 for using fieldset and mentioning legend. "Do not use tables for layout" do not mean "use any element you want except table", :). –  cic Aug 4 '09 at 22:05
    
Excellent semantics. If you add a wrapper to the labels, you can skip the width-constraints aswell. –  Magnar Aug 5 '09 at 5:01
<div style="float: left;">
    some label
</div>

<div style="float: left;">
    <input type="checkbox" />&#160;checkbox 1<br />
    <input type="checkbox" />&#160;checkbox 2<br />
    <input type="checkbox" />&#160;checkbox 3<br />
    <input type="checkbox" />&#160;checkbox 4
</div>
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I just got one for some reason, don't know why. Heres an upvote though –  Tyler Carter Aug 4 '09 at 21:00
    
Maybe someone has a hate-on for inline styles? Wasn't me though. –  Meredith L. Patterson Aug 4 '09 at 21:08
    
I wasn't writing production code, I was showing how it could be accomplished. Missing the forest for the trees I guess. –  Sean Bright Aug 4 '09 at 21:10
    
@Sean, its not your answer, its a feud between the layout mafia and the table apologists. –  Robert Harvey Aug 4 '09 at 21:11
    
Well then I shall graciously bow out. –  Sean Bright Aug 4 '09 at 21:11

In my opinion its more some kind of list than a table (but You did not list the whole picture). To me it looks like a definition list so I would use it (if not I would stick to a unordered list example the Magnar solution, adding labels.

The definition list version:

 <dl id="checkboxes">
    	<dt>same label or term</dt>
        <dd><input type="checkbox" id="chk1" /><label for="chk1">checkbox 1</label></dd>
        <dd><input type="checkbox" id="chk2" /><label for="chk2">checkbox 2</label></dd>
        <dd><input type="checkbox" id="chk3" /><label for="chk3">checkbox 3</label></dd>
        <dd><input type="checkbox" id="chk4" /><label for="chk4">checkbox 4</label></dd>
  </dl>
share|improve this answer
    
Great point, specially for bringing up an usually forgotten html element :P –  Everton Agner May 18 '12 at 20:58

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