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How do I list all FK's in a sqlserver database?

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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I use this statement, it seems to work pretty well.

SELECT RC.CONSTRAINT_NAME FK_Name
, KF.TABLE_SCHEMA FK_Schema
, KF.TABLE_NAME FK_Table
, KF.COLUMN_NAME FK_Column
, RC.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME PK_Name
, KP.TABLE_SCHEMA PK_Schema
, KP.TABLE_NAME PK_Table
, KP.COLUMN_NAME PK_Column
, RC.MATCH_OPTION MatchOption
, RC.UPDATE_RULE UpdateRule
, RC.DELETE_RULE DeleteRule
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS RC
JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE KF ON RC.CONSTRAINT_NAME = KF.CONSTRAINT_NAME
JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE KP ON RC.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = KP.CONSTRAINT_NAME
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Theoretically, this is hard. The relational model allows any field to relate to any other field. Which ones are actually used is defined by all possible SELECT statements that could be used.

Practically, it depends on how many tables have the FK definitions included. If someone bothered to carefully define all FK references -- and the SELECT statements stick to these rules -- you can query them.

However, since a SELECT statement can join on anything, there's no guarantee that you have all FK's unless you also have all SELECT statements.


Edit.

See http://www.lostechies.com/blogs/jimmy_bogard/archive/2008/11/26/viewing-all-foreign-key-constraints-in-sql-server.aspx

SELECT f.name AS ForeignKey, 
   OBJECT_NAME(f.parent_object_id) AS TableName, 
   COL_NAME(fc.parent_object_id, fc.parent_column_id) AS ColumnName, 
   OBJECT_NAME (f.referenced_object_id) AS ReferenceTableName, 
   COL_NAME(fc.referenced_object_id, fc.referenced_column_id) AS ReferenceColumnName 
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS f 
INNER JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns AS fc 
   ON f.OBJECT_ID = fc.constraint_object_id

Might work for you.

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All defined foreign keys are defined. How would I query the defined foreign keys? –  Byron Whitlock Aug 4 '09 at 21:18
    
This isn't in any way an answer to the question. A Foreign Key is a real thing, an object in the database (or at least a property of an object). The question doesn't ask to list every possible column that you can join against, that wouldn't make any sense –  Adam Batkin Aug 4 '09 at 21:29
    
@Byron Whitlock: "All" rarely means all, it usually means "All but for a few exceptions". –  S.Lott Aug 4 '09 at 21:31
1  
@Adam Batkin: The Relational model permits every possible column to be a foreign key. That's the definition. There's no restriction imposed anywhere. FK's defined in SQL server are an optimization for some queries. Until you have ALL the SELECTS, you don't really knwo. –  S.Lott Aug 4 '09 at 21:33
    
I wonder where in the original question it is mentioned that the only interesting FKs are the actually used ones... –  Vinko Vrsalovic Aug 4 '09 at 21:36
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Please have a look at this post.

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No! Bad! See meta.stackexchange.com/questions/8231/… –  jason Aug 4 '09 at 21:17
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You can also use the canonical INFORMATION_SCHEMA schema in SQL Server 2005 onwards:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/925738/how-to-find-foreign-key-dependencies-in-sql-server

This will work in another databases as well.

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I use http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189807.aspx

SELECT * FROM sys.foreign_keys

That is if you are on at least SQL Server 2005+ and want to see a list of the FK names.

But you probably want to know more about the tables that are related too, don't you, that is where the answer comes in handy.

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