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There is a code that I don't really understand from Sedgewick's Algorithms book, specifically the part on Comparators. I understand very well how everything else works, e.g., the algorithm provided, the intention of using Comparators vs Comparable, etc. However, the one thing that I don't seem to get are the parameters of the compare(Transaction v, Transaction w) method in the static class. For example, the array of Objects is passed and held by another Object reference in sort. When the helper method, less(), is invoked, the two elements of the Object array are held by another Object references. But this is what I don't get: In

    public static class WhoOrder implements Comparator<Transaction> {
    public int compare(Transaction v, Transaction w) {
        return v.who.compareTo(w.who);
    }
}

The Object references seem to have been replaced by Transaction references. How is this so? With polymorphism, you'd have to use an explicit downcast, but this seems to bypass that. My guess is that it's because of the parameterized type, but I don't know why that is.

The class which contains a static class that implements Comparator

public class Transaction {
private final String  who;      // customer
private final Date    when;     // date
private final double  amount;   // amount

...


// ascending order of account number
public static class WhoOrder implements Comparator<Transaction> {
    public int compare(Transaction v, Transaction w) {
        return v.who.compareTo(w.who);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ...
    Arrays.sort(a, new Transaction.WhoOrder());
}

The sorting class:

// use a custom order and Comparator interface - see Section 3.5
public static void sort(Object[] a, Comparator c) {
    int N = a.length;
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        for (int j = i; j > 0 && less(c, a[j], a[j-1]); j--) {
            exch(a, j, j-1);
        }
    }
}

// is v < w ?
private static boolean less(Comparator c, Object v, Object w) {
    return (c.compare(v, w) < 0);
}

// exchange a[i] and a[j]
private static void exch(Object[] a, int i, int j) {
    Object swap = a[i];
    a[i] = a[j];
    a[j] = swap;
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

WhoOrder is implemented as a Comparator with Transaction as its type parameter so the implementation of compare accepts two Transactions. However, the less method takes a raw Comparator (without a type). For backwards compatibility when you do this the generics type checking is disabled so you are able to pass 2 Objects to compare.

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Actually, I just realized why I was confused. From my limited java knowledge, the closest thing I've come across was something like: Item[] a = (Item[]) new Object[1]. Here, the Object needs to be downcasted. But in the code above, it doesn't. Could you explain why that is? Thanks. –  user1164937 Sep 6 '12 at 23:58
    
There is effectively an implicit cast. When doing v.who.compareTo(w.who) your compare method doesn't need any explicit casts in its implementation because it uses a type parameter. However when you have the raw call to compare in less if this was ever called with something other than Transactions then you would get a ClassCastException. It's the same principle as if you wrote a method that accepted Collection<Something> and retrieved objects from that collection but then passed that method a raw collection containing objects that weren't Somethings. –  mikej Sep 7 '12 at 9:58
    
Ah, thanks a lot! I'm just too used to using parameterized types in the main method. I've always thought the parameters were for what YOU want it to be, but I see how it works now. –  user1164937 Sep 7 '12 at 13:01
    
You should definitely read the generics tutorial especially chapter 6 on how interoperability with legacy code works. –  mikej Sep 7 '12 at 15:13

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