Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i want to convert in ruby

[[1, 1], [2, 3], [3, 5], [4, 1], [1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 5], [4, 1]]

into

[{1=>1}, {2=>3}, {3=>5}, {4=>1}, {1=>2}, {2=>3}, {3=>5}, {4=>1}]

and after this to obtain sum of all different keys:

{1=>3,2=>6,3=>10,4=>2}
share|improve this question
    
do you need the second step or just want to achieve the last step –  PriteshJ Sep 6 '12 at 12:56
    
no , the second step was just to make task more clear –  Nicolae Rotaru Sep 7 '12 at 8:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For the second question

sum = Hash.new(0)
original_array.each{|x, y| sum[x] += y}
sum # => {1 => 3, 2 => 6, 3 => 10, 4 => 2}
share|improve this answer
    
Unless I know I'm the only user of the hash, I don't like doing things like this, it returns a hash which behaves in ways most people aren't expecting. e.g. it's standard practice to check existence with Hash#[], and this will then return a truthy value. –  Joshua Cheek Sep 6 '12 at 12:43
    
@JoshuaCheek That is not the standard way to check existence. That will fail when you have nil values. The standard way is to use Hash#key?, and my code works well with it. –  sawa Sep 6 '12 at 12:46
    
The ratio in which I have seen Hash#[] to Hash#key? is probably on the order of 25:1, and that only because I'm grouping Hash#has_key? in with it. In those cases, it was used because false was a legitimate hash value (or the hash contents weren't known). Personally, as soon as I use a default value or block, I stop thinking of it as a hash and start thinking of it as an interface (which I occasionally replace later with a custom object). –  Joshua Cheek Sep 6 '12 at 13:10

Functional approach:

xs = [[1, 1], [2, 3], [3, 5], [4, 1], [1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 5], [4, 1]]    
Hash[xs.group_by(&:first).map do |k, pairs| 
  [k, pairs.map { |x, y| y }.inject(:+)]
end]
#=> {1=>3, 2=>6, 3=>10, 4=>2}

Using Facets is much simpler thanks to the abstractions map_by (a variation of group_by) and mash (map + Hash):

require 'facets'
xs.map_by { |k, v| [k, v] }.mash { |k, vs| [k, vs.inject(:+)] }
#=> {1=>3, 2=>6, 3=>10, 4=>2}
share|improve this answer

You don't need the intermediate form.

arrays = [[1, 1], [2, 3], [3, 5], [4, 1], [1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 5], [4, 1]]

aggregate = arrays.each_with_object Hash.new do |(key, value), hash|
  hash[key] = hash.fetch(key, 0) + value
end

aggregate # => {1=>3, 2=>6, 3=>10, 4=>2}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. My first questions as a Java developer, does this involve any form of virgin sacrifice, or does it work out of the box? –  willcodejavaforfood Sep 6 '12 at 12:32
    
thanx a lot for your hint ^^ –  Nicolae Rotaru Sep 6 '12 at 12:34
    
@willcodejavaforfood not really sure what you mean. If you'd like I can explain anything that isn't apparent. –  Joshua Cheek Sep 6 '12 at 12:38
    
@Joshua Cheek - It does look like magic to me at first glance, but having stared at it for a while it's beginning to make sense :) –  willcodejavaforfood Sep 6 '12 at 12:42
arr= [[1, 1], [2, 3], [3, 5], [4, 1], [1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 5], [4, 1]]

final = Hash.new(0)

second_step = arr.inject([]) do |arr,inner|
   arr << Hash[*inner]
   final[inner.first] += inner.last
   arr
end

second_step
#=> [{1=>1}, {2=>3}, {3=>5}, {4=>1}, {1=>2}, {2=>3}, {3=>5}, {4=>1}] 
final
#=> {1=>3, 2=>6, 3=>10, 4=>2}

if you directly only need the last step

arr.inject(Hash.new(0)){|hash,inner| hash[inner.first] += inner.last;hash}
=> {1=>3, 2=>6, 3=>10, 4=>2} 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.