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What is really happening in this code?

in this problem i cant apply my concepts of recursion

#include<stdio.h>
count(int); 
main()
{
  int x=4;
  count(x);
  return 0;
 }
 count(int n)
 {
   if(n>0)
   { 
     count(n-1);
     printf("%d",n);
     count(n-1);
   }
  }

when we run the program count(4),count(3),count.....count(0) is stored in stack...but when count(0) is called and the if condition is false..then where does the control go? please if anyone can explain with the help of a diagram showing various function calls.

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marked as duplicate by Wooble, Flexo, Blue Moon, BoltClock Sep 6 '12 at 12:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
This isn't valid C –  asawyer Sep 6 '12 at 12:21
2  
@asawyer sure it is. Very old, bad C, but still C. –  Flexo Sep 6 '12 at 12:23
2  
You have posted the same question at least 10 times in the last week. –  Blue Moon Sep 6 '12 at 12:23
2  
Doesn't this answer?. Then why create new user ids and ask again? Ask for clarification there itself if you don't get your answer! –  Blue Moon Sep 6 '12 at 12:27
2  
@Andreas Henning If I'm not mistaken, C functions return int by default. –  Coffee on Mars Sep 6 '12 at 12:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

can you try the following piece of code.

#include<stdio.h> 
count(int);  
int  main() 
{ 
    int x=4; 
    count(x); 
    return 0; 
} 

int count(int n) 
{ 
    if(n>0) 
    {  
        printf("%d",n); 
        return count(n-1);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("%d",n); 
        return n; 
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Ok I might have been fooled before, that surely this is not valid syntax! –  asawyer Sep 6 '12 at 12:37
    
Please do check the syntax yourself as i am not a c programmer. I have just given the logic for using recursion in this short program. –  Nitesh Sep 6 '12 at 12:44
    
@asawyer - it's invalid here but only the typo of } instead of { after the else. It's weird to declare count with an implicit int and define with explicit return type though. –  Flexo Sep 6 '12 at 12:44
    
Thanks Fleox for your comment! –  Nitesh Sep 6 '12 at 12:53

There's no need for a diagram. With count(0), the if statement fails, and count returns immediately without doing anything.

EDIT: Thanks to Flexo for pointing out that the program in its original form is UB, since there's no telling what a function declared to return int will do when it doesn't return anything. (In practice, I'm guessing that most calling conventions will behave innocuously, but it's still wrong, of course.)

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Note that count is assumed to return int, but is missing a return, so it's UB. –  Flexo Sep 6 '12 at 12:26
    
it doesent matter whether there is a return statement or not –  user1648810 Sep 6 '12 at 12:28
    
@user1648810 yes it does. Since you've not said otherwise the function is assumed to return an int. Not returning where something is expected is undefined behaviour. –  Flexo Sep 6 '12 at 12:32
    
the ans with x=3 is 1213121 –  user1648810 Sep 6 '12 at 12:33
1  
@user1648810: You're missing Flexo's point. Undefined behaviour doesn't mean the program will crash. It means that you can't assume anything about how the program will behave. If you got the answer you expected, then you got lucky. The next compiler might take exactly the same program and crash, or it might yield the wrong answer, or it might hack your bank account and send me all your money. –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 6 '12 at 12:36

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