Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am using Entity Framework 4.3.1 code first. I have 2 tables in my database with their column names listed:

Statuses table:

StatusID int
Status varchar(50)

RequestStatuses table:

RequestStatusID int
RequestStatus varchar(50)

I have 2 classes:

public class Status : IEntity
{
     public int Id { get; set; }
     public string Name { get; set; }

     public RequestStatus RequestStatus { get; set; }
}

public class RequestStatus : IEntity
{
     public int Id { get; set; }
     public string Name { get; set; }

     public Status Status { get; set; }
}

My database context class:

public class ICaseDbContext : DbContext
{
     public DbSet<Status> Statuses { get; set; }
     public DbSet<RequestStatus> RequestStatuses { get; set; }

     protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
     {
          modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new StatusConfiguration());
          modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new RequestStatusConfiguration());
     }
}

Their configurations:

class StatusConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Status>
{
     internal StatusConfiguration()
     {
          this.ToTable("Statuses");
          this.Property(x => x.Id).HasColumnName("StatusID");
          this.Property(x => x.Name).HasColumnName("Status");
     }
}

class RequestStatusConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<RequestStatus>
{
     internal RequestStatusConfiguration()
     {
          this.ToTable("RequestStatuses");
          this.Property(x => x.Id).HasColumnName("RequestStatusID");
          this.Property(x => x.Name).HasColumnName("RequestStatus");
     }
 }

The data in each table is like this:

RequestStatuses table:

RequestStatusID     RequestStatus
1                   RequestStatus1
2                   RequestStatus2
3                   RequestStatus3
4                   RequestStatus4

Statuses table:

StatusID            Status
1                   Status1
2                   Status2
3                   Status3
4                   Status4

The primary key of each table matches the primary key in the other table. So if I have a request status of RequestStatus1 then the corresponding status must be Status1. If I have a status of Status3 then the corresponding request status must be RequestStatus3.

Is this possible?

How do I set thtis up in EF

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you want a 1:1 mapping, so both ends are required, using Id's as the key.

Updating your configurations like this will create the tables you want:

class StatusConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Status>
{
    internal StatusConfiguration()
    {
        this.ToTable("Statuses");
        this.Property(x => x.Id).HasColumnName("StatusID");
        this.Property(x => x.Name).HasColumnName("Status");

        this.HasRequired(x => x.RequestStatus)
            .WithRequiredPrincipal();

    }
}

class RequestStatusConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<RequestStatus>
{
    internal RequestStatusConfiguration()
    {
        this.ToTable("RequestStatuses");
        this.Property(x => x.Id).HasColumnName("RequestStatusID");
        this.Property(x => x.Name).HasColumnName("RequestStatus");

        this.HasRequired(x => x.Status)
           .WithRequiredDependent();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this worked for me. Just 2 questions.. How does EF know to map the 2 primary keys? And how would the code look like if I wanted to map to 2 other fields to each other instead of the ids? – Brendan Vogt Sep 6 '12 at 13:29
    
It works because of how you're setting up the RequiredDependant and RequiredPrincipal mappings - by putting these on, EF makes the assumptions that are needed. If you want to map to other fields, you would add a .map(m => m.MapKey("KeyName") to the end of the fluent mapping – Mark Oreta Sep 6 '12 at 13:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.