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I'm trying to work out a design predicament I have.

ClassWithLongOperation
{
    Run()
    {
        RecrusiveOperation();
    }

    RecrusiveOperation()
    {
        /* RECURSION */
    }
}

MyThread
{
    ClassWithLongOperation Op1(10);
    Op1.Run();  // Takes several minutes.

    ClassWithLongOperation Op2(20);
    Op2.Run();

    SomeOtherClassWithLongOperation Op3;
    Op3.Run();

    // Do some other stuff
}

The GUI starts MyThread, which runs for a good 5-6 minutes. I want to be able to have a big fat Cancel button on my GUI, so the user can cancel the operation.

I could create a global boolean variable bCancelled, and check if its been set in RecursiveOperation, but I want to be a good C++ & OO programmer and avoid global variables. Especially if they would have to spread across multiple files.

So how would I (following good design) safely cancel MyThread? What could I change in my setup to allow this?

I'm also using _beginthreadex to start the thread, but I could use boost if it would allow for an easier solution.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your flag not need to be global to your entire program, but it needs to be visible to your class code. Create the flag to be a private instance member and a public function to change it to false/true. In your recursive function, test its value to verify if the task should continue. When you want, set its value to false (through the function of course) to stop the recursive calls, i.e., when the user clicks the button you call the function in the desired instance. This way you will not break any OO principle, since you have a private flag and a public member function to safely change it.

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But then I would have to make the instances of ClassWithLongOperation and SomeOtherClassWithLongOperation visible to the GUI. I was trying to contain them in the thread. –  Josh Sep 6 '12 at 14:21
    
@Josh: Not necessarily. You can create a function for the thread that call the functions to configure the flags of the instances. Then, in your GUI, you call the thread function. –  davidbuzatto Sep 6 '12 at 14:51

Using a global variable is actually not the worst thing in the world. Having a proliferation of unnecessary global variables leads to maintenance nightmares, but it actually sounds like a quick and easy-to-understand solution here. But if you want a clean OO solution, this is certainly possible:

EDIT My original post overlooked the fact that you want to be able to run several operations in sequence, and if any of them is cancelled, none of the remaining operations are performed. This means it's more useful to keep the bool flag inside the canceller, instead of separately in each cancellable operation; and exceptions are the nicest way to handle the actual control flow. I've also tightened up a few things (added volatile for the flag itself, made names clearer, restricted unnecessary access rights).

// A thing that can cancel another thing by setting a bool to true.
class Canceller {
public:
    Canceller : cancelledFlag(false) {}

    void RegisterCancellee(Cancellee const& c) {
        c.RegisterCanceller(cancelledFlag);
    }

    void Cancel() {
        cancelledFlag = true;
    }

private:
    volatile bool cancelledFlag;
};

class CancelButton : public Canceller {
    ...
    // Call Cancel() from on-click event handler
    ...
};

class Cancellation : public std::exception {
public:
    virtual const char* what() const throw() {
        return "User cancelled operation";
    }
};

// A thing that can be cancelled by something else.
class Cancellee {
    friend class Canceller;    // Give them access to RegisterCanceller()

protected:
    Cancellee() : pCancelledFlag(0) {}

    // Does nothing if unconnected
    void CheckForCancellation() {
        if (pCancelledFlag && *pCancelledFlag) throw Cancellation();
    }

private:
    void RegisterCanceller(volatile bool& cancelledFlag) {
        pCancelledFlag = &cancelledFlag;
    }

    volatile bool* pCancelledFlag;
};

class Op1 : public Cancellee {   // (And similarly for Op2 and Op3)
    ...
    // Poll CheckForCancellation() inside main working loop
    ...
};

MyThread
{
    CancelButton cancelButton("CANCEL!");

    try {
        ClassWithLongOperation Op1(10);
        cancelButton.RegisterCancellee(Op1);
        Op1.Run();  // Takes several minutes.

        ClassWithLongOperation Op2(20);
        cancelButton.RegisterCancellee(Op2);
        Op2.Run();

        SomeOtherClassWithLongOperation Op3;
        cancelButton.RegisterCancellee(Op3);
        Op3.Run();
    } catch (Cancellation& c) {
        // Maybe write to a log file
    }

    // Do some other stuff
}

The "double bouncing" registration allows the canceller to give access to a private flag variable.

The most important thing is to not use thread termination functions, except in very specialised cases. Why? They don't run destructors. Nor do they give the target thread any chance to "clean up".

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I kinda like the approach, but if I understand the code right, this means user has to press CANCEL several times to cancel every LongOperation. –  Fiktik Sep 6 '12 at 13:16
    
@Fiktik: No, the user only needs to press "Cancel" once... What makes you think multiple presses would be needed? (Could be a bug of course...) –  j_random_hacker Sep 6 '12 at 13:20
1  
Well, the way I understand OP's question is he wants to have a button that disrupts all the work his thread is supposed to do. But you have cancelled member for every operation in the chain of operations - this means user presses CANCEL, and the current operation is disrupted, only for the thread to continue with the next operation. –  Fiktik Sep 6 '12 at 13:23
    
@Fiktik: You're quite right, that went right past me. I will rethink my design... –  j_random_hacker Sep 6 '12 at 13:30
1  
This is nice. +1. I am not sure what is the reason for using volatile here though. To avoid UB in c++11 you would normally make it atomic<bool>, in c++03 the volatile here doesn't make much difference I think - are you afraid of some optimization techniques messing up the code? –  Fiktik Sep 6 '12 at 14:43

Instead of using a global variable, add a method to ClassWithLongOperation and/or MyThread, something like cancelOperation() that will set an internal boolean variable. The appropriate class methods would then need to check the variable at appropriate moments.

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You could implement a Stop() method for your ClassWithLongOperation and have the event handler for BigFatCancelButton to call this Stop() method for the current operation.

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... Or add a Stop() method to the Thread class and make the work objects be aware of the threads they're running in. You may as well throw in a Stop() method for the work objects. Depending on what's more important: Stop the thread or the work object.

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