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How in C# do you create a true singlecast delegate. i.e a delegate instance that can reference one (and only one) method in its invocation list and so be used as a callback (for a single subscriber) rather than an event (which may have many subscribers).

The Framework has the classes System.Delegate and System.MulticastDelegate, which gives the mistaken impression that System.Delegate is singlecast and System.Multicast delegate adds multicast capability. But the MSDN documentation for System.Delegate http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.delegate.aspx indicates that System.Delegate is in fact multicast...

"The invocation list of a delegate is an ordered set of delegates in which each element of the list invokes exactly one of the methods represented by the delegate."

...while the documentation for System.MulticastDelegate does not really explain what extra behaviour it provides.

The official documentation in this area is pretty confusing, but one thing which is clear is that end-users cannot derive from either System.Delegate or System.MulticastDelegate. So is there any way supported by the framework to create a true singlecast delegate that can be used as a variable to store a reference to a single callback?

@dtb. If I can use a singlecast delegate then the need for the runtime check is eliminated. Of course it's true that the application logic could still fail in other ways, such as the wrong handler being assigned, but at least if I use a singlecast delegate then the problem of there being multiple handlers where I only expect one is one problem that simply cannot exist, hence there is one less thing to check, simpler unit tests, more elegant design. Also if a delegate for a method with a return value has multiple handlers in its invocation list, then it is the value returned by the last handler in the list that is returned to the caller, not the first.

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2  
You could check at runtime if the invocation list contains more than one target. But why bother? If the delegate has a return value, only the value returned by the (iirc) first target is used. If a caller passes an instance with more than one target, it's the caller's problem, not the callee's. –  dtb Sep 6 '12 at 12:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you really need a "singlecast" delegate with an event why don't you simply implement your own add/remove methods for that event?

The "problem" of Delegate is that MulticastDelegate is a derived class so if anyone assigns a MulticastDelegate object to a Delegate variable then you'll always have a MulticastDelegate.

For example we can simplify the default event implementation to this:

private ChangedEventHandler _changed;
public event ChangedEventHandler Changed
{
   add
   {
      _changed += value;
   }
   remove
   {
      _changed -= value;
   }
}

Now let's change the event implementation to:

private ChangedEventHandler _changed;
public event ChangedEventHandler Changed
{
   add
   {
      _changed = value; // Do NOT combine delegates
   }
   remove
   {
      _changed -= value;
   }
}

Now what you have is (almost) a singlecast delegate, because of event syntax users can't assign directly a multicast delegate and only the last assigned delegate is stored. If your users are really malicious they can create a MulticastDelegate and then add that delegate to your event handler. If you really need to prevent this you may add this check to the add method:

if (value.GetInvocationList().Length > 1)
    throw new ArgumentException("MulticastDelegates are not allowed here.");
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That's good, but isn't there a way to achieve runtime enforcement rather than compile time enforcement? –  Neutrino Sep 6 '12 at 15:17
    
@Neutrino if something can't be done at compile time then you're sure it won't be done at run-time! It means: you do not need any extra check when you raise the event because you're sure it can't be a MulticastDelegate (and the "if value.GetInvocationList()..." is a run-time check). –  Adriano Repetti Sep 6 '12 at 15:34
    
Ooops, I meant "but isn't there a way to achieve compile time enforcement rather than runtime enforcement?" –  Neutrino Sep 7 '12 at 9:01
    
@Neutrino with custom event add/remove you're sure it won't happen (but users will "+=" even if in reality it's just "="...confusing). I think best solution is what proposed by DanBryant: it makes clear what you want. –  Adriano Repetti Sep 7 '12 at 9:30

It's a bit more awkward than using a delegate, but one approach is to pass a callback interface with the method you want. Since there can only be a single implementation of the method, only one callback can be registered.

public interface IDoSomething
{
    void DoSomething();
}

public sealed class MyClass
{
    private IDoSomething _doer;

    //We use a Set method rather than a property to prevent other classes from accessing the callback
    //Another common (and generally better) pattern is to pass the instance into the constructor
    public void SetSomethingDoer(IDoSomething doer)
    {
        _doer = doer;
    }

    //Other code can now access _doer to call back the method
}

This has the side benefit of allowing you to group multiple callback methods together, which often makes sense in these cases where you're trying to guarantee a single callback handler.

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+1 I agree, in this case if there is not a good reason to use a delegate (maybe compatibility?) then it's better an interface (even if it makes code more prolix). –  Adriano Repetti Sep 6 '12 at 15:38
    
But SetSomethingDoer can't rely on that DoSomething doesn't invoke multiple methods. I don't see the point here. –  dtb Sep 6 '12 at 16:44
    
@dtb, About the only thing this buys you is that you know there is only one method you're invoking directly. This is more applicable when you have a function, as a multicast can potentially call multiple functions and the return value can get lost if there are multiple delegates. With this pattern, there is only a single return value. If the interface implementation invokes other methods, that's an implementation detail. Other than that, it's primarily a semantic difference (it's clear that the intention is to allow only a single handler.) –  Dan Bryant Sep 6 '12 at 17:07

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