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SVN's log has a "-v" mode that outputs filenames of files changed in each commit, like so:

jes5199$ svn log -v
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r1 |   jes5199 | 2007-01-03 14:39:41 -0800 (Wed, 03 Jan 2007) | 1 line
Changed paths:
   A /AUTHORS
   A /COPYING
   A /ChangeLog
   A /EVOLUTION
   A /INSTALL
   A /MacOSX

Is there a quick way to get a list of changed files in each commit in git?

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5 Answers

up vote 384 down vote accepted

Try one of the following.

git log --name-status

or

git log --name-only

or

git log --stat
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21  
The last one is the most informative. –  Raffi Khatchadourian Jul 31 '12 at 0:55
4  
@RaffiKhatchadourian - unfortunately it doesn't display file additions - 0 files changed. git version 1.8.0.msysgit.0 –  kerim Feb 5 '13 at 7:07
2  
I use --name-status if I want to see a full pathname, which --stat doesn't provide. –  kghastie Jun 27 '13 at 14:38
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You can use the command git whatchanged to get a list of files that changed in each commit (along with the commit message).

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git whatchanged --stat –  svassr Oct 4 '13 at 19:37
1  
Almost four years later and the command is deprecated. You should use git log with parameters now. –  Rafael Mar 12 at 8:58
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git show is also a great command.

It's kind of like svn diff, but you can pass it a commit guid and see that diff.

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If you want to get the file names only without the rest of the commit message you can use:

git log --name-only --pretty=format: <branch name>

This can then be extended to use the various options that contain the file name:

git log --name-status --pretty=format: <branch name>

git log --stat --pretty=format: <branch name>

One thing to note when using this method is that there are some blank lines in the output that will have to be ignored. Using this can be useful if you'd like to see the files that have been changed on a local branch, but is not yet pushed to a remote branch and there is no guarantee the latest from the remote has already been pulled in. For example:

git log --name-only --pretty=format: my_local_branch --not origin/master

Would show all the files that have been changed on the local branch, but not yet merged to the master branch on the remote.

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git diff --stat HEAD^! shows changed files and added/removed line counts for the last commit (HEAD).

It seems to me that there is no single command to get concise output consisting only of filenames and added and removed line counts for several commits at once, so I created my own bash script for that:

#!/bin/bash
for ((i=0; i<=$1; i++))
do
    sha1=`git log -1 --skip=$i --pretty=format:%H`
    echo "HEAD~$i $sha1"
    git diff --stat HEAD~$(($i+1)) HEAD~$i 
done

To be called eg. ./changed_files 99 to get the changes in a concise form from HEAD to HEAD~99. Can be piped eg. to less.

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