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In C#:

List<List<Point>> SectionList = new List<List<Point>>();

SectionList contains lists of points where each sub list varies in how many points it contains.

What I'm trying to figure out is how to sort SectionList by the Count of sub lists in descending order.

So if SectionList had 3 lists of points, after sorting, SectionList[0] would contain the highest Count value of all 3 lists.

Thanks, Mythics

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list.OrderBy(x=>x.Count).ToList(); stackoverflow.com/questions/1976546/… –  SriN Sep 6 '12 at 14:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This should work:

SectionList.Sort((a,b) => a.Count - b.Count);

The (a,b) => a.Count - b.Count is a comparison delegate. The Sort method calls it with pairs of lists to compare, and the delegate that returns a negative number if a is shorter than b, a positive number if a is longer than b, and zero when the two lists are of the same length.

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Great answer... –  Ragesh Puthiyedath Jun 29 at 7:01
var sortedList = SectionList.OrderByDescending(l=>l.Count()).ToList();   
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While I really like the other answers, this one might be the "best" in that it's most intuitive and easy to remember. –  arviman Oct 31 '14 at 10:40

You could create a custom comparer.

public class ListCountComparer : IComparer<IList> {
    public int Compare(IList x, IList y) {
        return x.Count.CompareTo(y.Count);
    }
}

Then you can sort your list like this:

SectionList.Sort(new ListCountComparer());

Hope this helps :)

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While this works, it might be more useful to have an ListCountComparer<T> : IComparer<List<T>> Since you don't depend on the type of the inner list, the more general case could potentially be useful in comparing the counts of some other lists in the future. –  Servy Sep 6 '12 at 14:12
1  
But then you would have to pass in the T of your List<T>, even though you don't need it. I think ListCountComparer : IComparer<IList> is the most sensible. –  Menno van den Heuvel Sep 6 '12 at 14:21
    
Thanks for the suggestions, I've updated it to use an IList so it can be used on all lists :) –  Connor Hilarides Sep 6 '12 at 20:32

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