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I have an issue where I have a set of objects in the business layer that have an inheritance structure between them and I also have a set of DAL objects that back them which have a roughly parallel inheritance structure. The problem I have encountered is that the DAL type must be understood on multiple levels of the BOL inheritance, for example, a base business object must be able to access base DAL object properties, however the same property must provide the specific instance later.

Since C# doesn't support return covariance, I'm not able to simply use a more specific type in an override declaration. I'm also not able to use generics as I would have to do a concrete specification of the type to make use of it and that breaks further inheritance for the same return covariance reason. The only solution I've been able to come up with so far seems very scary so I wanted to post it here for feedback or alternate ideas.

It seems this can be dealt with by defining a generic interface IHasDal<TDalType>. I can then specify that the BOLBase : IHasDal<BaseDAL>. This then requires an implementation of the .Dal property on BOLBase. For BolChild, it is declared as BOLChild : BOLBase, IHasDal<ChildDAL> and then specifies a .Dal property that is of type ChildDAL. While these two commands are unrelated and specific to the level of the class they reside within, I linked them by having a private field in BOLBase of type BaseDAL. I can then cast it via AS for each child property implementation.

In theory it seems like this should give me what I'm looking for with minimal issues. It will be available for either an object implementing an IHasDal of whatever type I specify or for any given BOLBase derived class. It still feels ugly since it appears to be effectively relying on method hiding, but I can't think of anything better.

public interface IHasDal<TDalType>
    where TDalType : BaseDal
{
    TDalType Dal { get; set; }
}

public class BaseDal
{
}

public class BaseEntity : IHasDal<BaseDal>
{
    protected BaseDal _dal;

    public BaseDal Dal
    {
        get
        {
            return (BaseDal)_dal;
        }
        set
        {
            _dal = value;
        }
    }
}

public class ChildDal : BaseDal
{
}

public class ChildEntity : BaseEntity, IHasDal<ChildDal>
{
    public ChildDal Dal
    {
        get
        {
            return this._dal as ChildDal;
        }
        set
        {
            this._dal = value;
        }
    }
}
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Is this a better fit on Code Review? –  Robert Harvey Sep 6 '12 at 15:04
    
Possibly, but I couldn't find anything else related to the question either. I'm not sure that the fact I had one possible solution means I have the best answer to the original question. –  AJ Henderson Sep 6 '12 at 15:07
    
I would suggest looking at the Repository pattern. martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/repository.html –  Peter Ritchie Sep 6 '12 at 15:17
    
@PeterRitchie - We are actually using the Repository pattern already, the actual DAL object being described is actually an object which is populated by the repository and handed off to be used by the business object. It's a limitation we are currently stuck with for now. –  AJ Henderson Sep 6 '12 at 15:33
    
It's not clear based on your post why a domain object (BaseEntity) needs to know anything about a DAL. This is a problem on multiple levels. One: this is a violation of layering. You don't truly have a data access layer or a business object layer if they both know about each other (the DAL produces entities, which in turn know about a "DAL" object--lower-level layers cannot know or be coupled to higher-level layers). The repository is supposed to mediate between your BOL and DAL, what you've posted shows you're not implementing Repository if an entity is coupled to a DAL in some way –  Peter Ritchie Sep 6 '12 at 15:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The correct answer here seems to be that it is a bad idea to have two parallel layers like this where one is providing retrieval for the other. Generics on the return types of the one side can be used to meet a lot of the needs, but there are some pretty severe limitations on the functionality of the side using the generics due to co/contravarient issues associated with generics.

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