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Two scenarios:

Using the default collation:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `table` (
  `name` varchar(255) collate utf8_general_ci NOT NULL,
  UNIQUE KEY `name` (`name`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

SELECT `name` FROM `table` ORDER BY `name`;

Using COLLATE:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `table` (
  `name` varchar(255) collate utf8_bin NOT NULL,
  UNIQUE KEY `name` (`name`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

SELECT `name` FROM `table` ORDER BY `name` COLLATE utf8_general_ci;

I need to change from the first scenario to second because the index is case insensitive. Still ordering is important. There are experimental collations as utf8_general_cs but it requires special compilation.

Will this have an impact on the performance?

In my opinion if MySQL stores text fields internally in utf8 independent of collation it should not affect performance.

Edit: The output of explain in case COLLATE is used is the same as without.

mysql> EXPLAIN SELECT * 
    -> FROM `table`
    -> ORDER BY `name`
    -> COLLATE utf8_general_ci;
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
| id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra          |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | table | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |    5 | Using filesort | 
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> EXPLAIN SELECT * 
    -> FROM `table`
    -> ORDER BY `name`;
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
| id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra          |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | table | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |    5 | Using filesort | 
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The collation determines the manner in which the column is considered for indexing as well as the manner in which comparisons are made. utf8 bin is meant for comparing strings by binary value, and utf8 general is meant for comparing by alphabetical value. What's considered a match will vary by collation and the order will vary by collation. If the column is treated as a binary (as in UTF8 bin) a character is equal to another character if and only if its bit value is equivalent.

When you specify a different collation in a select statement from the default collation of a field, you can't take advantage of the existing index (which uses the default collation). It should be about the same if you manually specify a collation on a query using an indexed column as it would be on a non-indexed column (provided the manually specified collation is different from the column's default collation) because it would simply ignore the index, in which case MySQL would use QuickSort (using a comparator based on the specified collation).

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer. I don't want to make quick conclusions but this means that there is no way to have a case sensitive default utf8 collation except if custom compiling no? – Aalex Gabi Sep 6 '12 at 17:01
1  
@AalexGabi Unfortunately, I think you're right about that. utf8_general_cs is considered to be experimental... There are also some known quirks in it, even if you choose to compile it and enable it. Maybe you can think about whether latin1_general_cs would be suitable? If you're only going to be using latin1 characters, that could suit your purposes. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/… – hsanders Sep 6 '12 at 17:05
    
I am afraid that is not possible because Centreon is already installed by many users and data conversion would be necessary + many applications connect to the database relying on utf8 default charset. – Aalex Gabi Sep 6 '12 at 17:14
1  
@AalexGabi I thought that was likely to be the case... But figured I'd suggest it anyhow. – hsanders Sep 6 '12 at 17:15
1  
@AalexGabi There's also the option of creating your own collation... Although I'd also imagine you wouldn't want to do that either. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/… – hsanders Sep 6 '12 at 17:19

If you don't have an index on that column I don't think it will be slower. With indexed column it would be slower.

With first table I get Extra field = "Using index;", with second table "Using index; Using filesort". So the second would be slower.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I updated the question. – Aalex Gabi Sep 6 '12 at 15:42
    
Can you explain why it is slower if an index is involved? – Aalex Gabi Sep 6 '12 at 15:43
    
Your explains don't use index, too few rows maybe? – Pomyk Sep 7 '12 at 15:23

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