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I have code in one of the source file as follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int a ;
int b = 256 ;
int c = 16 ;
int d = 4 ;

int main() {

    if ((d <= (b) && (d == ( c / sizeof(a))))
    {
        printf("%d",sizeof(a) );
    }
    return 0;

} 

I have removed the casts and have simplified on the data names. The sizeof(a) can be taken as 4. I want to know if the the if syntax is a valid one and if so why doesn't it execute?

PS : I haven't sat down on this for long due to time constraints. Pardon me if you find a childish error in the code.

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closed as too localized by Mat, PeeHaa, casperOne Sep 6 '12 at 16:22

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1  
I don't know C, but are all those parenthesis really necessary in your if statement? –  PeeHaa Sep 6 '12 at 15:31
1  
Try doing the basic due diligence of parsing that expression and its obviously absurd parenthesization yourself instead of running to SO. –  Jim Balter Sep 6 '12 at 15:33
    
@pb2q A close paren is missing somewhere, but probably not at the end. –  Jim Balter Sep 6 '12 at 15:34
1  
Please don't change your code when there are already answer about the code. –  PeeHaa Sep 6 '12 at 15:36
    
Sigh. Now the OP has edited the expression to remove a paren. If I could give this question a dozen more downvotes I would. –  Jim Balter Sep 6 '12 at 15:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you tried to compile it?

Your if statement needs one more ) . That or simplify it to:

if ((d <= b) && (d == c / sizeof(a)))

Your printf statement should use "%zu\n" for C99, although it's complicated.

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1  
The correct format to print a size_t is %zu. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 6 '12 at 17:04
    
That's true for C99 at least, so I updated my answer, thanks. –  Yusuf X Sep 6 '12 at 21:52

One closing bracket is missing IMO. I opended up your if with vertical parantheses alignment technique.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int a ;
int b = 256 ;
int c = 16 ;
int d = 4 ;

int main() {

    if (
        (
         d <= (b) && (
                      d == (
                             c / sizeof(a)
                           )
                     )
        )
       //Here needs another closing parantheses
    {
        printf("%d",sizeof(a) );
    }
    return 0;

}

Actually you can sefely remove some parantheses here in your snippet.

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Try adding a newline to your printf statement:

printf("%d\n", sizeof a);

Standard output is usually buffered, so output doesn't always show up on your console immediately unless there's a newline or you add a fflush(stdout); after the printf call.

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((d <= (b) && (d == ( c / sizeof(a)))) 

Looks an extra ( before the b.

( (d <= b) && (d == (c/sizeof(a))))
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As my comment under OP are all those parenthesis really needed. (I'm not a C guy). It looks like bad mistakes going to happen to me (which is proven by OP). –  PeeHaa Sep 6 '12 at 15:33
    
@PeeHaa None of the inner parens are needed. Some people (not me) think the ones around the relational operators are good practice. –  Jim Balter Sep 6 '12 at 15:39

You have forgotten closing one paranthesis in line 11 you have opened six and closed five.

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I think you have an issue with your if statement, it should look like this

if ( (d <= b) && (d == ( c / sizeof(a))))

you had an extra ( on the left side of the 'b'

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