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I want a simple perl script that can help me impute missing nucleotides in aligned sequences: As an example, my old_file contains the following aligned sequences:

seq1
ATGTC
seq2
ATGTC
seq3
ATNNC
seq4
NNGTN
seq5
CTCTN

So I now want to infer all Ns in the file and get a new file with all the Ns inferred based on the majority nucleotide at a particular position. My new_file should look like this:

seq1
ATGTC
seq2
ATGTC
seq3
ATGTC
seq4
ATGTC
seq5
CTCTC

A script with usage: "impute_missing_data.pl old_file new_file" or any other approach will be helpful to me. Thank you.

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closed as too localized by perreal, David Precious, DavidO, dgw, Graviton Sep 10 '12 at 4:50

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4  
What have you tried? Where is the problem? –  choroba Sep 6 '12 at 15:38
1  
Do you need help with a specific part, or are you just expecting someone to write the whole script for you? If the latter, there are various outsourcing resources like odesk.com etc where you could hire someone to perform the task for you. –  David Precious Sep 6 '12 at 15:53
4  
Kwame, you are extraordinarily lucky. Though you have asked 5 questions and accepted none of them AND though you have asked others to simply do your work for you, they still have come through for you. Why don't you thank them with some votes, thank the others who have helped you by accepting some answers. And next time, try a little before asking others to do your work for you. –  Joel Berger Sep 6 '12 at 16:48
    
Thanks for the advice Joel –  Kwame Oduro Sep 6 '12 at 18:28
    
I see the "Thanks for the advice Joel" posted one hour ago, but don't see the acceptance of the answer to which you replied, "Thanks Borodin" two hours ago. If the answer worked for you, you should accept it. If you don't know how, you should check the FAQ ASAP. –  DavidO Sep 6 '12 at 20:11

3 Answers 3

This seems to do what is required

use strict;
use warnings;

use Fcntl 'SEEK_SET';

open my $fh, '<', 'old_file' or die $!;

my @counts;

while (<$fh>) {
  next if /[^ATGCN\s]/;
  my $i = 0;
  $counts[$i++]{$_}++ for /[ATGC]/g;
}

for my $maj (@counts) {
  ($maj) = sort { $maj->{$b} <=> $maj->{$a} } keys %$maj;
}

seek $fh, 0, SEEK_SET;

while (<$fh>) {
  s/N/$counts[pos]/eg unless /[^ATGCN\s]/;
  print;
}

output

seq1
ATGTC
seq2
ATGTC
seq3
ATGTC
seq4
ATGTC
seq5
CTCTC
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Borodin. –  Kwame Oduro Sep 6 '12 at 17:58
use warnings;
use strict;
my (@data, $counts, @max);
#read in the file
while (<>) {
  chomp;
  next if /seq/;
  my @sings = split //; 
  for (my $i = 0; $i < @sings; $i++) {
    $counts->[$i]{$sings[$i]}++ if $sings[$i] ne 'N';
  }
  push (@data, \@sings);
}
# get most freq letters
foreach my $col (@$counts) {
  my ($max, $maxk) = (0, '');
  foreach my $cell (keys %$col) {
    if ($col->{$cell} > $max) {
      ($max, $maxk) = ($col->{$cell}, $cell);
    }   
  }
  push (@max, $maxk);
}
# substitute Ns with most freq letters
foreach (my $i = 0; $i < @data; $i++) {
  my $row = $data[$i];
  for (my $i = 0; $i < @$row; $i++) {
    if ($row->[$i] eq 'N') {
      $row->[$i] = $max[$i];
    }   
  }
  print "seq".($i+1)."\n".join("", @$row), "\n";
}
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1  
Here is a shorter, but somewhat uglier solution: perl -w -ne'print and next if /^seq/; chomp; @seq= split //; for my $i (0..$#seq){my ($e,%s)=($seq[$i],%{$stat[$i]}); if($e=~/N/){$seq[$i]=[sort{$s{$a} <=> $s{$b}} keys %s]->[-1]; warn "substituted N with $seq[$i] in col $i, count $s{$seq[$i]}\n"}else{$stat[$i]->{$e}++}}print @seq, "\n"' using a frequency[column]->{character}-like data structure to keep statistical information. And I get away with only one loop. –  amon Sep 6 '12 at 16:09
    
This solution removes the seqN labels and replaces them, assuming they are sequential, start at 1, and appear at every other line. This is expecting a lot of a brief example –  Borodin Sep 6 '12 at 17:04
    
Thank Borodin. I am currently trying this solution –  Kwame Oduro Sep 6 '12 at 18:29

Here ist the script from my comment in a more readable form:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
my @stat;
while(<>) {
  print and next if /^seq/;
  chomp;
  my @seq = split //;
  for my $i (0..$#seq){
    my ($e, %s) = ($seq[$i], %{$stat[$i]}); # read-only aliases
    if($e=~/N/){
      my $substitution = [sort {$s{$a} <=> $s{$b}} keys %s]->[-1];
      $seq[$i] = $substitution;
      warn "substituted N with $substitution in col $i, count $s{$substitution}\n";
    } else {
      $stat[$i]->{$e}++;
    }
  }
  print @seq, "\n"';
}

To supress the undefined warnings, either silence them (bad) or initialize the stats:

for my $i (0..4) {
  for my $c (qw(A C G T)) {
    $stat[$i]->{$c} = 0;
}

or

my @stat = map +{map {$_ => 0} qw(A C G T)} 0..4;
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work at all (throws Can't use an undefined value as a HASH reference) unless you initialise @stat correctly - that should be my @stat = map +{ map {$_ => 0} qw(A C G T) }, 0 .. 4. Also, it sets values for N based only on data preceding the current line, not on the whole file –  Borodin Sep 6 '12 at 16:54
    
Thank you all for your help –  Kwame Oduro Sep 6 '12 at 17:49

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