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Hey guys Im working on my first linked list to hold student records (name id gpa addr) but im getting errors i was wondering if you guys can spot the error?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{


struct Student
{
    string name;
    string address;
    double id;
    double gpa;
    Student *next;

};

Student *head;
head = NULL;

string Student_name;
double Student_id;
double Student_gpa;
string Student_address;


for (int i = 0; i<20; i++)
{
    cout << "What is the student's name?";
    getline (cin, Student_name);
    cout << "What is " << Student_name << "'s ID Number?";
    cin >> Student_id;
    cout << "What is " << Student_name << "'s GPA?";
    cin >> Student_gpa;
    cout << "What is " << Student_name << "'s address?";
    getline (cin, Student_address);
}
    Student *newStudent;
    Student *Student_ptr;
    newStudent = new Student;
    newStudent->name = Student_name;
    newStudent->id = Student_id;
    newStudent->gpa = Student_gpa;
    newStudent->address = Student_address;
    newStudent->next = NULL;

    if (!head)
        head = newStudent;
    else
    {
        Student_ptr = head;

        while (Student_ptr -> next)
            Student_ptr = Student_ptr->next;
            Student_ptr->next = newStudent;
    }

    cout << endl;


Student *Display_ptr;
Display_ptr = head;
while (Display_ptr)
{
    cout << Display_ptr-> name << endl;
    cout << Display_ptr-> id << endl;
    cout << Display_ptr-> gpa << endl;
    cout << Display_ptr-> address << endl;

    Display_ptr = Display_ptr->next;
    cout << endl;

}

return 0;

}

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by casperOne Sep 6 '12 at 16:21

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You could have a generic list if you used templates. But, in your case, there's no point... – Luchian Grigore Sep 6 '12 at 15:50
4  
You asked what you are doing wrong, are you having a problem with your implementation? This site is for specific questions, if you want a code review, feel free to post on codereview.stackexchange.com – Chad Sep 6 '12 at 15:51
1  
This approach is better, rather than -1. – Coding Mash Sep 6 '12 at 15:52
2  
You might get more constructive responses if you give some details about the errors you are getting. Nobody wants to spend time running your code to see what happens. – Kristopher Johnson Sep 6 '12 at 15:55
2  
@KristopherJohnson: more importantly, the errors should be stated explicitly because they might be functional errors that we don't have any reason to notice, or they might be compiler/runtime errors we do not see when we test it. For example, I can build and run the supplied code without it crashing. – Rook Sep 6 '12 at 16:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, I don't know about using a template, unless if you mean using the std list rather than making your own. Having the struct Student within the body of the main function doesn't seem great to me. This is part of the rewriting of the code that would be good to do. and making something like

using namespace std;
namespace MyDataStructs{

class MyLinkedListNode
{
public:
  MyLinkedListNode():
    name("Empty"),
    address("Empty"),
    studentID(0.0),
    gpa(0.0),
    next(NULL)
  {
  }
  ~MyLinkedListNode();

  void setName(const string& a_name){name = a_name;}
  void setAddress(const string& a_address){address = a_address;}
  void setID(const int& a_Id){studentID = a_Id;}
  void setGPA(const double& a_GPA){gpa = a_GPA;}
  void setNextNode(MyLinkedListNode* a_node){next = a_node;}

  string getName(){return name;}
  string getAddress(){return address;}
  int getId(){return studentID;}
  double getGPA(){return gpa;}
  MyLinkedListNode* getNextNode(){return next;}

private:
  string name;
  string address;
  int studentID;
  double gpa;
  MyLinkedListNode *next;
};

class MyLinkedList
{
  MyLinkedList():
    m_size(0)
  {
  }
  ~MyLinkedList()
  {
    clear();
  }

  void push_back(const MyLinkedListNode& a_node)
  {
    MyLinkedListNode* newNode = new MyLinkedListNode(a_node);
    if(m_end == NULL)
    {
      m_head = newNode;
      m_end = newNode;
    }
    else
    {
      m_end->setNextNode(newNode);
      m_end = newNode;
    }
    m_size++;
  }

  bool deleteNode(const int& a_index)
  {
    if(a_index >= m_size)
      return false;
    if(m_head == NULL)
      return false;

    m_size--;
    MyLinkedListNode* currentNode;

    if(a_index == 0)
    {
      currentNode = m_head->getNextNode();
      delete m_head;
      m_head = currentNode;
      return true;
    }
    curentNode = m_head;
    MyLinkedListNode* previousNode;
    for(int i = 0; i < a_index; i++)
    {
      previousNode = currentNode;
      currentNode = currentNode->getNextNode();
    }
    if(currentNode == m_end)
    {
      m_end = previousNode;
    }
    previousNode->setNextNode(currentNode->getNextNode());
    delete currentNode;
    return true;
  }

  void clear()
  {
    MyLinkedListNode* currentNode = m_head;
    MyLinkedListNode* nextNode;
    while(currentNode != NULL)
    {
      nextNode = currentNode->getNextNode();
      delete currentNode;
      currentNode = nextNode;
    }
  }

private:
  MyLinkedListNode* m_head;
  MyLinkedListNode* m_end;
  int m_size;

};

}//MyDataStructs

I dunno, I got bored, what do you guys think.... fun to revisit some basic data structures though.

share|improve this answer

Well, it would be best to make the actual linked list it's own class, and you could even make the struct it's own class, so you can re-use the classes in the future. The Node could be a template class, but the actual linked list class could stay the same; it'd just have a data member of type "LinkedListNode" which would change depending on what data you need.

The way it's set up now, you'd have to re-write most of this stuff. just to implement a second linked list with a minor change. Making the linked list a class also means you can write actual insert/delete/searc/etc. functions, instead of doing that stuff in main.

share|improve this answer

struct definitions should not go inside of main(). Technically, since this is C++, you should really be using classes instead of structs.

More importantly, your loop needs to be allocating new data structures each iteration. That is, each time the user enters student information, that should go inside of a new linked list element and then added to the existing list.

share|improve this answer
1  
that compiles fine, but the code is easier to understand if you separate data abstractions from procedures. – Kevin Sep 6 '12 at 16:00
2  
There's no inherent reason to use classes instead of structs. There's very little difference between them, but for an aggregate that only holds data (as in the example), most people prefer structs. – Pete Becker Sep 6 '12 at 16:24

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