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The content of my input file is shown below:

abc\**def\ghi**\abc\!!!!!
abc\**4nfiug\frgrefd\gtefe\wf4fs**\abc\df3gwddw
abc\**eg4/refw**\abc\f3

I need to replace whatever string in between abc \ --------------\abc in my input file with ABC\CBA

I have tried something like below to get the strings that need to be replaced.But I get stuck when I need to use the search and replace:

my $string1 = qr/abc\W+([^a]+)/;
my $string2 = map{/$string1/ => " "} @input_file; #the string that need to be replaced
my $string3 = 'ABC\CBA'  #string i that i want it to replace to

s/$string2/$string3/g

Can anyone help on this? Thanks in advance.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

open my $fh,"<", "tryit.txt" or die $!;

while (my $line = <$fh>) {
    $line =~ s/(abc\\)(.*?)(\\abc)/$1ABC\\CBA$3/;
    print $line;
}

gives the following with the input data. Is that what you're looking for?

abc\ABC\CBA\abc\!!!!!
abc\ABC\CBA\abc\df3gwddw
abc\ABC\CBA\abc\f3
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mike.This is almost what I want.The results printed on the unix is what I want.However, I need to overwrite my input file with the result obtained.FYI, my input file is still the same before and after executing the script. –  Steven Sep 6 '12 at 22:49
    
There's dozens of ways to do this depending on how often this needs to be used. The easiest was (in my opinion), is to write the output to a temp file, delete the original, and then rename the temp to the original input file name. –  Mike M Sep 6 '12 at 23:27
    
Based on @TLP's edits, I'm guessing my methods are old school :-P –  Mike M Sep 6 '12 at 23:32
    
@steven You can use the -i switch from the command line to do in-place edit. –  TLP Sep 7 '12 at 6:00

perl -i -pe 's/this/that/g;' file1

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A one-liner to fix a file:

perl -plwe 's/abc\\\K.*(?=\\abc)/ABC\\CBA/' input.txt > output.txt

Or as a script:

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<DATA>) {
    s/abc\\\K.*(?=\\abc)/ABC\\CBA/;
    print;
}

__DATA__
abc\**def\ghi**\abc\!!!!!
abc\**4nfiug\frgrefd\gtefe\wf4fs**\abc\df3gwddw
abc\**eg4/refw**\abc\f3

The \K (keep) escape sequence means these characters will not be removed. Similarly, the look-ahead assertion (?= ... ) will keep that part of the match. I assumed you only wanted to change the characters in between.

Instead of \K one can use a look-behind assertion: (?<=abc\\). As a personal preference, I used \K instead.

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If you do not want the substitution to operate on the default variable $_, you have to use the =~ operator:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my @input_file = split /\n/, <<'__EOF__';
abc\**def\ghi**\abc\!!!!!
abc\**4nfiug\frgrefd\gtefe\wf4fs**\abc\df3gwddw
abc\**eg4/refw**\abc\f3
__EOF__

my $pattern = qr/abc\\.*\\abc/;       # pattern to be matched
my $string2 = join "\n", @input_file; # the string that need to be replaced
my $string3 = 'ABC\CBA';              # string i that i want it to replace to

$string2 =~ s/$pattern/$string3/g;
print $string2;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks choroba. I have tried to open my file and do all the searching and replacing.however, it seems lk no effect on my input file. i have tried below: foreach my $file ($input) { open(I,$file) or die $!; <I>; while(<I>) { my $pattern = qr/abc\\.*\\abc/;my $string2 = join "\n", @input_file;my $string3 = 'ABC\CBA';$string2 =~ s/$pattern/$string3/g; print $string2; } close(I) } –  Steven Sep 6 '12 at 16:49
    
Why do you first split on newline, then join that split with newline? Seems redundant. –  TLP Sep 6 '12 at 16:54
    
@TLP: If you asked me, I just wanted to use @input_file as the author of the question. –  choroba Sep 6 '12 at 17:04
    
@choroba Ah ok. –  TLP Sep 6 '12 at 17:05

To address your comment about replacing text "inplace" in the file directly, you can use the -i switch for a one-liner. In a script, you can perhaps look at using Tie::File, which allows read-write access to lines of a file as (mutable) elements in an array. To copy Mike/TLP's answer:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::File;

tie my @file, "Tie::File", "tryit.txt" or die $!;

# I think you have to use $_ here (done implicitly)
while (@file) {
    s/(abc\\)(.*?)(\\abc)/$1ABC\\CBA$3/;
    print;
}
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