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I was reading the java book named java puzzlers in which I have discovered that ..Never exit a finally block with a return, break, continue, or tHRow, and never allow a checked exception to propagate out of a finally block. Could you please explain this in detail with some short small examples , So that I can understand it completely..!

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Never say never. But conceptually a finally block should be executed to completion, since it's intended to mirror the activities that went on during setup for try. –  Hot Licks Sep 6 '12 at 16:50
    
why was the question closed? I don't see it as being not constructive. –  dcernahoschi Sep 6 '12 at 17:19
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closed as not constructive by casperOne Sep 6 '12 at 17:03

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1 Answer

//Run this code and you will see that when you run this you will get the value which is

//returned by finally block so priority is given to it even if there is return in try and

//catch.

class A
{
int one()
    {
        try
            {
             int n[]= new int[5];
             System.out.println("inside try");
             n[7]=89;
             return 10;
            }
        catch(Exception e)
            {
             System.out.println(e);
             return 399;
            }
        finally
            {
             System.out.println(" this is finally block");
             return 20; //priority is given to finally block
            }
        }
 }

class final7
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
    A ob= new A();
    System.out.println(ob.one());
    }
}
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Please format your post properly. –  Hot Licks Sep 6 '12 at 16:51
    
Removing the extraneous blank lines would help too. –  Hot Licks Sep 6 '12 at 18:26
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