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Assume that I have a MemoryStream and function that operates on bytes.

Current code is something like this:

void caller()
{
    MemoryStream ms = // not important
    func(ms.GetBuffer(), 0, (int)ms.Length);
}

void func(byte[] buffer, int offset, int length)
{
    // not important
}

I can not change func but I would like to minimize possibility of changing stream data from within the func.

How could / should I rewrite the code to be sure that stream data won't be changed?

Or this can't be done?

EDIT:

I am sorry, I didn't mention that a I would like to not make copies of data.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Call .ToArray.

func(ms.GetBuffer().ToArray(), 0, (int)ms.Length);

From MSDN (emphasis mine):

Note that the buffer contains allocated bytes which might be unused. For example, if the string "test" is written into the MemoryStream object, the length of the buffer returned from GetBuffer is 256, not 4, with 252 bytes unused. To obtain only the data in the buffer, use the ToArray method; however, ToArray creates a copy of the data in memory.


Ideally you would change func to take an IEnumerable<byte>. Once a method has the array, you're trusting they won't modify the data if you don't want them to. If the contract was to provide IEnumerable<byte>, the implementer would have to decide if they need a copy to edit or not.

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If you can't make a copy (ToArray as suggested in other answers) and can't change signature of the func function the only thing left is try to validate that function did not change the data.

You may compute some sort of hash before/after call and check if it is the same. It will not guarantee that func did not changed the underlying data (due to hash collisions), but at least will give you good chance to know if it happened. May be useful for non-production code...

The real solution is to either provide copy of the data to untrusted code OR pass some wrapper interface/object that does not allow data changes (requires signature changes/rewrite for func).

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+1 Validating afterwards is a great idea! –  dtb Sep 6 '12 at 16:53

Copy the data out of the stream by using ms.ToArray(). Obviously, there'll be a performance hit.

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You cannot pass only a 'slice' of an array to a method. Either you pass a copy of the array to the method and copy the result back:

byte[] slice = new byte[length];
Buffer.BlockCopy(bytes, offset, slice, 0, length);
func(slice, 0, length);
Buffer.BlockCopy(slice, 0, bytes, offset, length);

or, if you can change the method, you pass some kind of proxy object that wraps the array and checks for each access if it's within the allowed range:

class ArrayView<T>
{
    private T[] array;
    private int offset;
    private int length;

    public T this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            if (index < offset || index >= offset + length)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRange("index");
            return array[index];
        }
        set
        {
            if (index < offset || index >= offset + length)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRange("index");
            array[index] = value;
        }
    }
}
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Are you trying to make sure that func() is never actually able to change the memory stream, or is it enough if your code can throw an exception if something is changed? Sounds like you want to do something like:

void caller()
{
    MemoryStream ms = // not important
    var checksum = CalculateMyChecksum(ms);
    func(ms.GetBuffer(), 0, (int)ms.Length);
    if(checksum != CalculateMyChecksum(ms)){
        throw new Exception("Hey! Someone has been fiddling with my memory!");
    }
}

I would not feel comfortable recommending this for anything important / critical though. Could you give some more information? Maybe there is a better solution to your problem, and a way to avoid this issue completely.

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