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I have written below code for detecting first duplicate character in a string.

public static int detectDuplicate(String source) {
    boolean found = false;
    int index = -1;
    final long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    final int length = source.length();
    for(int outerIndex = 0; outerIndex < length && !found; outerIndex++) {
        boolean shiftPointer = false;
        for(int innerIndex = outerIndex + 1; innerIndex < length && !shiftPointer; innerIndex++ ) {
            if ( source.charAt(outerIndex) == source.charAt(innerIndex)) {
                found = true;
                index = outerIndex;
            } else {
                shiftPointer = true;
            }
        }
    }
    System.out.println("Time taken --> " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - start) + " ms. for string of length --> " + source.length());
    return index;
}

I need help on two things:

  • What is the worst case complexity of this algorithm? - my understanding is O(n).
  • Is it the best way to do this? Can somebody provide a better solution (if any)?

Thanks, NN

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2  
Take out all the benchmarking stuff. Or better yet, write the algorithm in pseudocode. –  David Titarenco Sep 6 '12 at 17:09
2  
By "first duplicate character", do you mean the duplicate character whose first occurrence is earliest, or whose second occurrence is earliest? In other words, in "abba", is "a" or "b" the first duplicate character? –  Tom Anderson Sep 6 '12 at 17:21
    
I am sorry I forgot to add an example to show my motive. –  Niranjan Sep 6 '12 at 18:05

6 Answers 6

As mentioned by others, your algorithm is O(n^2). Here is an O(N) algorithm, because HashSet#add runs in constant time ( the hash function disperses the elements properly among the buckets) - Note that I originally size the hashset to the maximum size to avoid resizing/rehashing:

public static int findDuplicate(String s) {
    char[] chars = s.toCharArray();
    Set<Character> uniqueChars = new HashSet<Character> (chars.length, 1);
    for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
        if (!uniqueChars.add(chars[i])) return i;
    }
    return -1;
}

Note: this returns the index of the first duplicate (i.e. the index of the first character that is a duplicate of a previous character). To return the index of the first appearance of that character, you would need to store the indices in a Map<Character, Integer> (Map#put is also O(1) in this case):

public static int findDuplicate(String s) {
    char[] chars = s.toCharArray();
    Map<Character, Integer> uniqueChars = new HashMap<Character, Integer> (chars.length, 1);
    for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
        Integer previousIndex = uniqueChars.put(chars[i], i);
        if (previousIndex != null) {
            return previousIndex;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The original procedure returns the index of the first occurrence duplicate character, not the character itself. But that's a simple modification. –  Tom Anderson Sep 6 '12 at 17:16
    
not really O(N) since HashSet does not guarantee O(1) insertion time –  Qnan Sep 6 '12 at 17:16
3  
1  
@TomAnderson it says "assuming the hash function disperses the elements properly among the buckets", which I take as an indication of the fact that the worst-case complexity is actually not O(1). This is, of course, irrelevant, as hash table can be implemented so as to ensure O(1) lookup/insertion/deletion. –  Qnan Sep 6 '12 at 17:26
1  
@Qnan but the Character class will disperse the elements evenly, Character.hashCode() just returns the integer value of the char value. –  matt b Sep 6 '12 at 17:31

The complexity is roughly O(M^2), where M is the minimum between the length of the string and the size of the set of possible characters K.

You can get it down to O(M) with O(K) memory by simply memorizing the position where you first encounter every unique character.

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This is O(n**2), not O(n). Consider the case abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzz. outerIndex will range from 0 to 25 before the procedure terminates, and each time it increments, innerIndex will have ranged from outerIndex to 26.

To get to O(n), you need to make a single pass over the list, and to do O(1) work at each position. Since the job to do at each position is to check if the character has been seen before (and if so, where), that means you need an O(1) map implementation. A hashtable gives you that; so does an array, indexed by the character code.

assylias shows how to do it with hashing, so here's how to do it with an array (just for laughs, really):

public static int detectDuplicate(String source) {
    int[] firstOccurrence = new int[1 << Character.SIZE];
    Arrays.fill(firstOccurrence, -1);
    for (int i = 0; i < source.length(); i++) {
        char ch = source.charAt(i);
        if (firstOccurrence[ch] != -1) return firstOccurrence[ch];
        else firstOccurrence[ch] = i;
    }
    return -1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I had in mind! A hashtable solves this easily. –  David Titarenco Sep 6 '12 at 17:13

Okay, I found below logic to reduce O(N^2) to O(N).

public static int detectDuplicate(String source) {
    int index = -1;
    boolean found = false;
    final long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for(int i = 1; i <= source.length() && !found; i++) {
        if(source.charAt(i) == source.charAt(i-1)) {
            index = (i - 1);
            found = true;
        }
    }

    System.out.println("Time taken --> " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - start) + " ms. for string of length --> " + source.length());
    return index;
}

This also shows performance improvement over my previous algorithm which has 2 nested loops. This takes 130ms. to detect first duplicate character from 63million characters where the duplicate character is present at the end.

I am not confident if this is the best solution. If anyone finds a better one, please please share it.

Thanks,

NN

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution only finds duplicate characters that are close to each other, try finding the first duplicate in the string: "abca". Your algorithm won't find any. –  jontejj Feb 24 '13 at 10:51
    
Hi, my intention was that. My apologies again for confusion, but I wanted to find the first duplicate character which appears side by side. In your string there is no such occurrence. –  Niranjan Jan 21 '14 at 8:29

I can substantially improve your algorithm. It should be done like this:

StringBuffer source ...
char charLast = source.charAt( source.len()-1 );
int xLastChar = source.len()-1;
source.setCharAt( xLastChar, source.charAt( xLastChar - 1 ) );
int i = 1;
while( true ){
    if( source.charAt(i) == source.charAt(i-1) ) break;
    i += 1;
}
source.setCharAt( xLastChar, charLast );
if( i == xLastChar && source.charAt( xLastChar-1 ) != charLast ) return -1;
return i;

For a large string this algorithm is probably twice as fast as yours.

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O(1) Algorithm

Your solution is O(n^2) because of the two nested loops.

The fastest algorithm to do this is O(1) (constant time):

public static int detectDuplicate(String source) {
    boolean[] foundChars = new boolean[Character.MAX_VALUE+1];
    for(int i = 0; i < source.length(); i++) {
        if(i >= Character.MAX_VALUE) return Character.MAX_VALUE;
        char currentChar = source.charAt(i);
        if(foundChars[currentChar]) return i;
        foundChars[currentChar] = true;
    }
    return -1;
}

However, this is only fast in terms of big oh.

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1  
You mean O(N) I think –  David Titarenco Sep 6 '12 at 17:19
1  
I would be very, very interested to see an O(1) algorithm for solving this problem. Could you describe one? –  Tom Anderson Sep 6 '12 at 17:19
    
Sure, I edited and added a O(1) algo. –  amoebe Sep 6 '12 at 17:26
2  
That's O(n). It's also incorrect; if the string is every possible character in order, followed by a repetition of one of those characters, then you will return -1, rather than the index of that character. –  Tom Anderson Sep 6 '12 at 17:30
1  
that's what happens when one starts talking about the complexity of java code, rather than just algorithms :) –  Qnan Sep 6 '12 at 17:42

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