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Had a strange bug appear today. In our app, on one file, all the objects got a function attached, as if they were prototyped. We're not prototyping our arrays but I've worked on other stuff where the arrays and objects had prototypes and when you did a for(this in that) loop the prototypes would be included as items and we had to filter them. So, two part question:

  1. If you prototype your arrays will the index increase by + # of prototypes? So if array(a,b,c) has array.prototype.function(), would it's index count be 3 or 4?

  2. Should this be happening?

We're thinking one of the jquery plugins we have is being all evil.

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closed as not a real question by Matt Ball, martin clayton, ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ, Geoff Lanotte, vstm Sep 7 '12 at 7:18

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

By "index count" I assume you mean length property. In which case, the answer to your first question is "no." The length property is tied to the highest numerical index of an array. So, for instance, if you have the following code, arr.length will be 4:

var arr = [];
arr[3] = true;
arr.length; //is 4

However, you referred to for-in loops, which have strange behavior in this situation. If we perform a for-in on arr (from above), we get the following:

var output = "";
for (i in arr) { //Don't do this!
    output += i;
} 
output; //is "3" (not "0123" as you might expect)

As I mentioned, prototyped properties have no impact on the length:

Array.prototype.foo = true;
var arr = [];
arr[3] = true;
arr.length; //is 4

However, they do impact for-in loops (under normal circumstances):

var output = "";
for (i in arr) { //arr from the previous code block.
    output += i;
} 
output; //is "3foo" (or maybe "foo3", there's no guarantee form the spec either way)

There are a few ways to get around this. First of all, you should really never be using for-in on array objects because of this kind of nonsense. But if you MUST do it for some reason, you should always protect your for-in loop using a hasOwnProperty() filter, like so:

var output = "";
for (i in arr) { //arr from the previous code block
    if (arr.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
        output += i;
    }
} 
output; //is "3"

Again, there's no guarantee of ordering on for-in. So if arr was [1,1,1], you might get output as "201" (though it's unlikely).

Another option is to try and save yourself from others' bad coding by using a feature of ES5 (if present) to protect your prototyped properties on the object level by setting them to be non-enumerable. You would do that like this:

var foo = (function() { /* do something */ });
if(typeof Object.defineProperty === "function") { //If ES5
    Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "foo", {
        value: foo,
        enumerable: false //make it not enumerable
    });
} else { //For older browsers
    Array.prototype.foo = foo;
}

var arr = [], output = "";
arr[3] = true;

for(i in arr) { //Seriously, don't do this.
    output += i;
}
output; //is "3"

I cannot stress enough that doing a for-in over an Array is a bad idea. In fact, I would tend to avoid for-in under pretty much all circumstances because you never know if someone out there wants to be a jerk and will toss this into the middle of their code:

Object.prototype.ponies = "Ponies!";
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Although arrays are objects, and thus can have number of properties, ONLY integer properties count toward the array itself.

var a = [];
alert(a.length); // 0
a.foo = "Ha";
alert(a.length); // 0
a[1] = 10;
alert(a.length); // 1

Array.prototype.shuffle = function() { ... }
alert(a.length); // 1

Though it is not recommended to use for ... in to process arrays, some people still do. for ... in would find both foo and shuffle.

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If you avoid using for (var i in array) to iterate your arrays and iterate them ONLY by numeric index from 0 to array.length - 1, then you will NOT have problems if someone adds something to the array prototype. This is exactly why you should avoid using the for/in technique for iterating arrays.

Some safe ways to iterate arrays no matter how many properties or methods have been added to the array or the array prototype:

for (var i = 0, len = array.length; i < len; i++) {
    // access array[i] here
}

var i = 0, len = array.length;
while (i < len) {
    // access array[i] here
    i++;
}
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