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Suppose I have a large collection of integers (say 50,000,000 of them).

I would like to write a function that returns me the largest integer in the collection that doesn't exceed a value passed as a parameter to the function. E.g. if the values were:

 Values = [ 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60]

then find(Values, 25) should return 20.

The function will be called many times a second and the collection is large. Assuming that the performance of a brute-force search is too slow, what would be an efficient way to do it? The integers would rarely change, so they can be stored in a data structure that would give the fastest access.

I've looked at gb_trees but I don't think you can obtain the "insertion point" and then get the previous entry.

I realise I could do this from scratch by building my own tree structure, or binary chopping a sorted array, but is there some built-in way to do it that I've overlooked?

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If the values are not sorted, this would be more clear if the sample data is not sorted. (The sorted approach is definitely the simplest and has good time complexity, especially when amortized over many calls.) –  user166390 Sep 6 '12 at 17:45
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is another code sample that uses ets. I believe a lookup would be made in about constant time:

1> ets:new(tab,[named_table, ordered_set, public]).
2> lists:foreach(fun(N) -> ets:insert(tab,{N,[]}) end, lists:seq(1,50000000)).
3> timer:tc(fun() -> ets:prev(tab, 500000) end).
{21,499999}
4> timer:tc(fun() -> ets:prev(tab, 41230000) end).
{26,41229999}

The code surrounding would be a bit more than this of course but it is rather neat

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That's interesting. I'd assumed ets:prev/2 required the key to be an existing key in the set. I'll try it out - thanks! –  Paul Cager Sep 10 '12 at 10:41
    
So simple! As Paul says, I had in mind that the key must exist. You should add a small value to get the right answer ets:prev(tab, 500000.1) :o) –  Pascal Sep 10 '12 at 11:27
    
@PaulCager No the key does not need to exist IFF the table is of type ordered_set. For set and bag the key must exist. –  rvirding Sep 10 '12 at 20:19
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To find nearest value in large unsorted list I'd suggest you to use divide and conquer strategy - and process different parts of list in parallel. But enough small parts of list may be processed sequentially.

Here is code for you:

-module( finder ).
-export( [ nearest/2 ] ).

-define( THRESHOLD, 1000 ).

%%
%% sequential finding of nearest value
%%
%% if nearest value doesn't exists - return null
%%
nearest( Val, List ) when length(List) =< ?THRESHOLD ->
        lists:foldl(
                fun
                ( X, null ) when X < Val ->
                        X;
                ( _X, null ) ->
                        null;
                ( X, Nearest ) when X < Val, X > Nearest ->
                        X;
                ( _X, Nearest ) ->
                        Nearest
                end,
                null,
                List );
%%
%% split large lists and process each part in parallel
%%
nearest( Val, List ) ->
        { Left, Right } = lists:split( length(List) div 2, List ),
        Ref1 = spawn_nearest( Val, Left ),
        Ref2 = spawn_nearest( Val, Right ),
        Nearest1 = receive_nearest( Ref1 ),
        Nearest2 = receive_nearest( Ref2 ),
        %%
        %% compare nearest values from each part
        %%
        case { Nearest1, Nearest2 } of
                { null, null } ->
                        null;
                { null, Nearest2 } ->
                        Nearest2;
                { Nearest1, null } ->
                        Nearest1;
                { Nearest1, Nearest2 } when Nearest2 > Nearest1 ->
                        Nearest2;
                { Nearest1, Nearest2 } when Nearest2 =< Nearest1 ->
                        Nearest1
        end.

spawn_nearest( Val, List ) ->
        Ref = make_ref(),
        SelfPid = self(),
        spawn(
                fun() ->
                        SelfPid ! { Ref, nearest( Val, List ) }
                end ),
        Ref.

receive_nearest( Ref ) ->
        receive
                { Ref, Nearest } -> Nearest
        end.

enter image description here

Testing in shell:

1> c(finder).
{ok,finder}
2> 
2> List = [ random:uniform(1000) || _X <- lists:seq(1,100000) ].
[444,724,946,502,312,598,916,667,478,597,143,210,698,160,
 559,215,458,422,6,563,476,401,310,59,579,990,331,184,203|...]
3> 
3> finder:nearest( 500, List ).
499
4>
4> finder:nearest( -100, lists:seq(1,100000) ).
null
5> 
5> finder:nearest( 40000, lists:seq(1,100000) ).
39999
6> 
6> finder:nearest( 4000000, lists:seq(1,100000) ).
100000

Performance: (single node)

7> 
7> timer:tc( finder, nearest, [ 40000, lists:seq(1,10000) ] ). 
{3434,10000}
8> 
8> timer:tc( finder, nearest, [ 40000, lists:seq(1,100000) ] ).
{21736,39999}
9>
9> timer:tc( finder, nearest, [ 40000, lists:seq(1,1000000) ] ).
{314399,39999}

Versus plain iterating:

1> 
1> timer:tc( lists, foldl, [ fun(_X, Acc) -> Acc end, null, lists:seq(1,10000) ] ).
{14994,null}
2> 
2> timer:tc( lists, foldl, [ fun(_X, Acc) -> Acc end, null, lists:seq(1,100000) ] ).
{141951,null}
3>
3> timer:tc( lists, foldl, [ fun(_X, Acc) -> Acc end, null, lists:seq(1,1000000) ] ).
{1374426,null}

So, yo may see, that on list with 1000000 elements, function finder:nearest is faster than plain iterating through list with lists:foldl.

You may find optimal value of THRESHOLD in your case.

Also you may improve performance, if spawn processes on different nodes.

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+1. Great, complete response. Very nice. –  Diego Sevilla Sep 7 '12 at 11:09
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So if the input isn't sorted, you can get a linear version by doing:

closest(Target, [Hd | Tl ]) ->
        closest(Target, Tl, Hd).

closest(_Target, [], Best) -> Best;
closest(Target, [ Target | _ ], _) -> Target;
closest(Target, [ N | Rest ], Best) ->
    CurEps = erlang:abs(Target - Best),
    NewEps = erlang:abs(Target -  N),
    if NewEps < CurEps ->
            closest(Target, Rest, N);
       true ->
            closest(Target, Rest, Best)
    end.

You should be able to do better if the input is sorted.

I invented my own metric for 'closest' here as I allow the closest value to be higher than the target value - you could change it to be 'closest but not greater than' if you liked.

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In my opinion, if you have a huge collection of data that does not change often, you shoud think about organize it. I have wrote a simple one based on ordered list, including insertion an deletion functions. It gives good results for both inserting and searching.

-module(finder).

-export([test/1,find/2,insert/2,remove/2,new/0]).

-compile(export_all).

new() -> [].

insert(V,L) -> 
    {R,P} = locate(V,L,undefined,-1),
    insert(V,R,P,L).

find(V,L) -> 
    locate(V,L,undefined,-1).

remove(V,L) ->  
    {R,P} = locate(V,L,undefined,-1),
    remove(V,R,P,L).

test(Max) -> 
    {A,B,C} = erlang:now(),
    random:seed(A,B,C),
    L = lists:seq(0,100*Max,100),
    S = random:uniform(100000000),
    I = random:uniform(100000000),
    io:format("start insert at ~p~n",[erlang:now()]),
    L1 = insert(I,L),
    io:format("start find at ~p~n",[erlang:now()]),
    R = find(S,L1),
    io:format("end at ~p~n result is ~p~n",[erlang:now(),R]).

remove(_,_,-1,L) -> L;
remove(V,V,P,L) ->
    {L1,[V|L2]} = lists:split(P,L),
    L1 ++ L2;
remove(_,_,_,L) ->L.

insert(V,V,_,L) -> L;
insert(V,_,-1,L) -> [V|L];
insert(V,_,P,L) ->
    {L1,L2} = lists:split(P+1,L),
    L1 ++ [V] ++ L2.

locate(_,[],R,P) -> {R,P};
locate (V,L,R,P) -> 
    %% io:format("locate, value = ~p, liste = ~p, current result = ~p, current pos = ~p~n",[V,L,R,P]),
    {L1,[M|L2]} = lists:split(Le1 = (length(L) div 2), L),
    locate(V,R,P,Le1+1,L1,M,L2).

locate(V,_,P,Le,_,V,_) -> {V,P+Le};
locate(V,_,P,Le,_,M,L2) when V > M -> locate(V,L2,M,P+Le);
locate(V,R,P,_,L1,_,_) -> locate(V,L1,R,P).

which give the following results

(exec@WXFRB1824L)6> finder:test(10000000).

start insert at {1347,28177,618000}

start find at {1347,28178,322000}

end at {1347,28178,728000}

result is {72983500,729836}

that is 704ms to insert a new value in a list of 10 000 000 elements and 406ms to find the nearest value int the same list.

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However, on my laptop, i am stuck when I try to generate a 50 000 000 integers list (eheap_alloc: Cannot allocate 298930300 bytes of memory). so it it is not the right storage to use :o(. –  Pascal Sep 8 '12 at 5:40
    
Thanks. That was the kind of thing I was thinking of - how to structure the data for easy look up. I was thinking along the lines of fixed arrays and binary searches. –  Paul Cager Sep 10 '12 at 10:37
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I tried to have a more accurate information about the performance of the algorithm I proposed above, an reading the very interesting solution of Stemm, I decide to use the tc:timer/3 function. Big deception :o). On my laptop, I got a very bad accuracy of the time. So I decided to left my corei5 (2 cores * 2 threads) + 2Gb DDR3 + windows XP 32bit to use my home PC: Phantom (6 cores) + 8Gb + Linux 64bit.

Now tc:timer works as expected, I am able to manipulate lists of 100 000 000 integers. I was able to see that I was loosing a lot of time calling at each step the length function, so I re-factored the code a little to avoid it:

-module(finder).

-export([test/2,find/2,insert/2,remove/2,new/0]).

%% interface

new() -> {0,[]}.

insert(V,{S,L}) -> 
    {R,P} = locate(V,L,S,undefined,-1),
    insert(V,R,P,L,S).

find(V,{S,L}) -> 
    locate(V,L,S,undefined,-1).

remove(V,{S,L}) ->  
    {R,P} = locate(V,L,S,undefined,-1),
    remove(V,R,P,L,S).

remove(_,_,-1,L,S) -> {S,L};
remove(V,V,P,L,S) ->
    {L1,[V|L2]} = lists:split(P,L),
    {S-1,L1 ++ L2};
remove(_,_,_,L,S) ->{S,L}.

%% local

insert(V,V,_,L,S) -> {S,L};
insert(V,_,-1,L,S) -> {S+1,[V|L]};
insert(V,_,P,L,S) ->
    {L1,L2} = lists:split(P+1,L),
    {S+1,L1 ++ [V] ++ L2}.

locate(_,[],_,R,P) -> {R,P};
locate (V,L,S,R,P) -> 
    S1 = S div 2,
    S2 = S - S1 -1,
    {L1,[M|L2]} = lists:split(S1, L),
    locate(V,R,P,S1+1,L1,S1,M,L2,S2).

locate(V,_,P,Le,_,_,V,_,_) -> {V,P+Le};
locate(V,_,P,Le,_,_,M,L2,S2) when V > M -> locate(V,L2,S2,M,P+Le);
locate(V,R,P,_,L1,S1,_,_,_) -> locate(V,L1,S1,R,P).

%% test

test(Max,Iter) -> 
    {A,B,C} = erlang:now(),
    random:seed(A,B,C),
    L = {Max+1,lists:seq(0,100*Max,100)},
    Ins = test_insert(L,Iter,[]),
    io:format("insert:~n~s~n",[stat(Ins,Iter)]),
    Fin = test_find(L,Iter,[]),
    io:format("find:~n ~s~n",[stat(Fin,Iter)]).

test_insert(_L,0,Res) -> Res;
test_insert(L,I,Res) ->
    V = random:uniform(1000000000),
    {T,_} = timer:tc(finder,insert,[V,L]),
    test_insert(L,I-1,[T|Res]).

test_find(_L,0,Res) -> Res;
test_find(L,I,Res) ->
    V = random:uniform(1000000000),
    {T,_} = timer:tc(finder,find,[V,L]),
    test_find(L,I-1,[T|Res]).

stat(L,N) ->
    Aver = lists:sum(L)/N,
    {Min,Max,Var} = lists:foldl(fun (X,{Mi,Ma,Va}) -> {min(X,Mi),max(X,Ma),Va+(X-Aver)*(X-Aver)} end, {999999999999999999999999999,0,0}, L),
    Sig = math:sqrt(Var/N),
    io_lib:format("   average: ~p,~n   minimum: ~p,~n   maximum: ~p,~n   sigma   : ~p.~n",[Aver,Min,Max,Sig]).

Here are some results.

1> finder:test(1000,10). insert:

average: 266.7,

minimum: 216,

maximum: 324,

sigma : 36.98121144581393.

find:

average: 136.1,

minimum: 105,

maximum: 162,

sigma : 15.378231367748375.

ok

2> finder:test(100000,10).

insert:

average: 10096.5,

minimum: 9541,

maximum: 12222,

sigma : 762.5642595873478.

find:

average: 5077.4,

minimum: 4666,

maximum: 6937,

sigma : 627.126494417195.

ok

3> finder:test(1000000,10).

insert:

average: 109871.1,

minimum: 94747,

maximum: 139916,

sigma : 13852.211285206417.

find: average: 40428.0,

minimum: 31297,

maximum: 56965,

sigma : 7797.425562325042.

ok

4> finder:test(100000000,10).

insert:

average: 8067547.8,

minimum: 6265625,

maximum: 16590349,

sigma : 3199868.809140206.

find:

average: 8484876.4,

minimum: 5158504,

maximum: 15950944,

sigma : 4044848.707872872.

ok

On the 100 000 000 list, it is slow, and the multi process solution cannot help on this dichotomy algorithm... It is a weak point of this solution, but if you have several processes in parallel requesting to find a nearest value, it will be able to use the multicore anyway.

Pascal.

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