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I have a table called categories and a table called business_categories_coupling. In Categories, you have the usual id, name, parent. In the Coupling table, you have business_id and category_id. Each business can have multiple categories, so I store them in that table. It kinda looks like this:

business_id    category_id
73             80
73             81
73             90
74             4
74             10

Right now, my query is just selecting all the categories, doing a foreach and doing a db query in each loop to find how many businesses are in that category. Obviously not the right way to go about it.

Is there a way to do a SQL query that basically selects all the categories, gets the number of times it comes up in the coupling table, and add a count to each category?

SELECT
    C.*
FROM
    CATEGORIES AS C
LEFT JOIN
    BUSINESS_CATEGORIES_COUPLING AS B
ON
    C.id = B.category_id;

Kinda like that, but with a count somewhere. I've tried various setups but nothing works like I want. Any suggestions?

EDIT 1

Solution as provided by @phani-rahul, but I added a WHERE clause:

SELECT cat.id AS id, cat.name AS name, cat.slug AS slug, COUNT(cat.id) AS business_count
FROM categories AS cat
LEFT JOIN business_categories_coupling AS coupling ON cat.id=coupling.category_id
WHERE coupling.category_id IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY cat.id
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, there is. you can use Group by clause:

select a.id as category, count(a.id) as count_of_category
from categories a
left join business_categories_coupling b on a.id=b.category_id
group by a.id

your result would be something like:

category   count_of_category
80          2
81          5
90          1
.           .
.           .
.           .
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Awesome, this is great. Thanks Phani! The only weird thing is, if a category doesn't have any relation in the coupling table, it shows up as 1, not 0. –  dallen Sep 6 '12 at 19:14
    
Figured it out. I added WHERE coupling.category_id IS NOT NULL. I'll add the complete solution to my original post and accept yours! –  dallen Sep 6 '12 at 19:53
    
you are welcome @dallen –  Phani Rahul Sep 7 '12 at 6:35
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You also need to GROUP by the fields of C table.

SELECT C.id, C.field1, C.field2, COUNT(*)
    FROM CATEGORIES AS C
    LEFT JOIN BUSINESS_CATEGORIES_COUPLING AS B
ON (C.id = B.category_id)
GROUP BY C.id, C.field1, ...

(In MySQL you can GROUP BY the single value C.id; in other SQL dialects you can express the concept of "grouping by rows of C table" by grouping by "C.*"; in some others you need to specify all non-aggregate columns of your query, in this case all columns you select from C, one by one).

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What you're looking for is a GROUP BY clause.

SELECT
   C.*, count(C.id)
FROM
   CATEGORIES AS C
LEFT JOIN
   BUSINESS_CATEGORIES_COUPLING AS B
ON
    C.id = B.category_id
 GROUP BY B.category_id;
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