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I wrote the following code:

    static {
        /* Attempts to load JDBC driver */
        try {
            Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            throw new DBConfigurationException("JDBC Driver not found.", e);
        }
        /* Attempts to load configuration */
        conf = loadConfiguration(); //this may throw some subclasses of RuntimeException
    }

because I want to JDBC driver and configuration to be loaded only once.

I wanted to do something like this at the startup (I will simplify as much as possible):

public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
        // load the class that contains the code above
    } catch (DBConfigurationException e) {
        // display proper error message using JOptionPane, then quit
    } catch (MissingConfigurationException e) {
        // display proper error message using JOptionPane
        // show a JDialog and allow user to input and store a configuration
    } catch (InvalidConfigurationException e) {
        // display proper error message using JOptionPane
        // show a JDialog and allow user to input and store a configuration
    }

    /* if everything it's ok */
    // do some other checks in order to decide which JFrame display first.
}

Now, the problem is that if an exception occur, JVM will throw ad ExceptionInInitializerError and will just not construct the object. Probably I may still understand what went wrong, catching ExceptionInInitializerError (even if that just sounds wrong to me) and checking its cause (I still did not try to do so but I think it's possible).

I need that object, because in case the exception is recoverable (e.g. MissingConfigurationException) the program will not exit and will need that object.

Should I avoid the static initializer? I could do something like:

private static final Configuration conf = null;

Constructor() {
    if (conf == null) {
        /* Attempts to load JDBC driver */
        try {
            Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            throw new DBConfigurationException("JDBC Driver not found.", e);
        }
        /* Attempts to load configuration */
        conf = loadConfiguration();
    }
}

But even this one sounds incorrect to me: exceptions may be thrown only at the first attempt of use (which I know will be at startup because I have to do that checks), that is when the class is loaded. So it would be theoretically more correct the first way. :\

What should I do? Which way is more correct?

The problem is that the class with static initializer NEEDS both driver and configuration, so it SHOULDN'T be used before that both of them are available. :\

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By definition an exception thrown from the static{} block generates ExceptionInInitializer and marks the class unusable. This is the way it should be (plus or minus a small delta). –  Hot Licks Sep 6 '12 at 18:10
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3 Answers

Why don't you just check for these conditions in your main() method, or something invoked by the main() method? The entrypoint for the application can only be entered once. A simple approach would be far better than static initializer and classloader trickery.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    if (!requirementsMet()) {
         System.exit(1);
    }
    //proceed with app...
}

private static boolean requirementsMet() {
     // check if DB driver can be loaded, and other non-recoverable errors
}
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+1 for the word "trickery." ;) Also, static initializers should be more or less avoided because of the weird errors you can get if they fail, such as NoClassDefFound errors. –  Brian Sep 6 '12 at 18:06
1  
Well, this is good from the standpoint of not needing trickery, but it doesn't isolate the requirements in a modular way. Depends on application size and what you are writing, I guess. –  Tony K. Sep 6 '12 at 18:06
1  
@TonyK. It depends on the application. If it needs database access to run, it should fail in the main thread and terminate. If it doesn't, then it should fail elsewhere, I agree. –  Brian Sep 6 '12 at 18:07
    
I agree with Brain's comment. If it needs database access to run, it should fail, otherwise move code to elsewhere. –  Nambari Sep 6 '12 at 18:08
1  
@Brian. My comment is about where to put requirementsMet()...if the database is meant to be some kind of pluggable module that might use different drivers, then an abstraction around that is ideal. Calling it from main() is fine. –  Tony K. Sep 6 '12 at 18:09
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Create a static property initializerException() on the target class, set it to the caught exception, and re-throw in the main, like this:

public class ClassWithTheDriver {
    private static Exception initializerException;
    public static Exception getInitializerException() {
        return initializerException;
    }
    static {
        try {
            Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            // Store the exception for later use
            initializerException = DBConfigurationException("JDBC Driver not found.", e);
        }
    }
}

public void main(String[] args) {
    Exception initException = ClassWithTheDriver.getInitializerException();
    // The line above invokes the static initializer, loading the driver.
    // If an exception is caught there, getInitializerException returns non-null
    if (initException != null) {
        // Do something as if you caught the exception here
    }
}
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It might be ok, even if it seems to me like it's a workaround rather than a solution... btw why not declaring "private static DBConfigurationException initException"? –  tmh Sep 6 '12 at 18:37
    
@tmh That would work too, assuming that this is the only try/catch that you are planning to have in your static initializer. I was assuming that other try/catch blocks would follow, with their own assignments to initException using exceptions of different type. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 6 '12 at 18:42
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You can use a Singleton class. e.g.

DBConfigProvider {
    private Configuration conf = null
    private DBConfigProvider() {
      /* Attempts to load JDBC driver */
      try {
          Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
      } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
          throw new DBConfigurationException("JDBC Driver not found.", e);
      }
      /* Attempts to load configuration */
      conf = loadConfiguration(); //this may throw some subclasses of RuntimeException
    }

    private static DBConfigProvider instance = null;

    public static Configuration getConf() {
         if (instance == null) {
             instance = new DBConfigurationProvider();
         }

         return instance.conf;
    }
}
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This only moves the problem to getConf(), which can still throw exceptions at the first call; btw how should I use it? The line "private static final Configuration conf = DBConfigProvider.getConf()" would still throw ExceptionInInitializerError, if I'm not mistaken. –  tmh Sep 6 '12 at 18:32
    
Why do you need to have static variable for configuration? I was expecting you would call DBConfigProvider.getConf() when you actually need it. The idea behind making this a singleton is that you keep a single instance of configuration, at the same time initialize it "late" (when required). –  Sameer Sep 6 '12 at 18:45
    
Because being that class responsible for connection to DB, it should hold the necessary details (drivers & configuration) and be able to work without making assumption on its own usage (e.g. load driver and set configuration before calling the method getConnection() ). Other classes should call its methods being unaware of those details. (sorry for bad english, I feel dyslexic today :D) –  tmh Sep 7 '12 at 10:07
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