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I have an architecture set up that relies heavily on generics. At one point, I do have to cast to a base type, and as a matter of curiosity I'm wondering if I can sidestep it.

The background is we have a number of production line groups that we want printed to a webpage. Since each group's production lines has some of the same information, but also some different information, I've employed an abstract class:

public abstract class ProductionLine
{
    public int LineNumber { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public double Target { get; set; }
    public double Actual { get; set; }
    public double Variance { get; set; }
}

And here is an example concrete implementation:

public class TissueProductionLine : ProductionLine
{
    public double Budget { get; set; }
    public double PercentOnTarget { get; set; }
}

Since we're talking about groups of production lines, I've created an abstract object to house the name of the group and all of its production lines:

public abstract class ProductionLineGroup<T> where T : ProductionLine
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<T> ProductionLines { get; set; }
}

And here's a concrete implementation of a group:

public class TissueProductionLineGroup : ProductionLineGroup<TissueProductionLine>
{
    public string TissueType { get; set; }

}

All is well, but I want to be able to render a production line group out to HTML as a series of tables. To separate my concerns, I created formatters that will consume the groups and emit the needed markup. Using a factory, I will select the appropriate formatter:

public static class ProductionLineGroupFormatterFactory<T> where T : ProductionLine
{
    public static ProductionLineGroupFormatter<T> GetProductionLineGroupFormatter(ProductionLineGroup<T> group)
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(TissueProductionLineGroup))
        {
            return new TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter<T>();
        }
        throw new ApplicationException("Could not find an appropriate formatter for this Production Line type:" + typeof(T).ToString());
    }
}

The factory method returns an object with a base type of ProductionLineGroupFormatter:

public abstract class ProductionLineGroupFormatter<T> where T : ProductionLine
{
    public abstract string Render(ProductionLineGroup<T> group);
}

The derived type that actually does the rendering is TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter:

public class TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter<T> : ProductionLineGroupFormatter<T> where T : ProductionLine
{
    public override string Render(ProductionLineGroup<T> group)
    {
            foreach (ProductionLine line in group.ProductionLines)
            {
                TissueProductionLine tLine = (TissueProductionLine)line;
                sb.Append(@"<tr>
                                <td>" + tLine.Name + @"</td>
                                <td>" + tLine.Actual + @"</td>
                                <td>" + tLine.Target + @"</td>
                                <td>" + tLine.Variance + @"</td>
                                <td>" + tLine.PercentOnTarget + @"</td>
                        </tr>");
            }
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
}

Note the cast I need to make in my foreach loop. I can't figure out if it is possible to avoid it. I originally tried to constrain T to TissueProductionLine since it is derived from ProductionLine, but I get an error that "There is no implicit reference conversion from 'T' to 'TissueProductionLine'. I then tried to create an implicit operator so that conversions could be made between ProductionLine and TissueProductionLine, but you can't do that with base and derived types.

If anyone can shed any light on this, I'd appreciate having my curiosity satisfied! Thanks!

Chris

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Why can't TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter<T> extend ProductionLineGroupFormatter<TissueProductionLine>, and if it's a formatter for that specific type, then what's the generic T type constraint for? –  mellamokb Sep 6 '12 at 18:18
    
If I remove the constraint, then I get an error in my factory: Cannot implicitly convert type 'TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter' to 'ProductionLineGroupFormatter<T>' –  Mister Epic Sep 6 '12 at 18:43

3 Answers 3

You should be able to do this:

public class TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter : 
  ProductionLineGroupFormatter<TissueProductionLine> {
  ...
}

UPDATE

For the factory, you could implement type specific methods instead of using conditional logic to test for the types:

public static class ProductionLineGroupFormatterFactory {
  public static ProductionLineGroupFormatter<TissueProductionLine> GetProductionLineGroupFormatter(ProductionLineGroup<TissueProductionLine> group) {
    return new TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter();
  }
  // .. other factory methods....
}

And maybe you could create better named methods, which would obviate the need for the parameter:

public static class ProductionLineGroupFormatterFactory {
  public static ProductionLineGroupFormatter<TissueProductionLine> GetTissueProductionLineGroupFormatter() {
    return new TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter();
  }
  // .. other factory methods....
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tried that, but then I update my factory to this: public static class ProductionLineGroupFormatterFactory<T> where T : ProductionLine { public static ProductionLineGroupFormatter<T> GetProductionLineGroupFormatter(ProductionLineGroup<T> group) { if (typeof(T) == typeof(TissueProductionLineGroup)) { return new TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter(); } } } Then I get the error Cannot implicitly convert type 'TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter' to 'ProductionLineGroupFormatter<T> –  Mister Epic Sep 6 '12 at 18:44
    
@ChrisHardie: added an idea for that.... –  Jordão Sep 6 '12 at 20:14

If you make your classes implement this interface, and have your factory return an IProductionLineGroupFormatter<T>, this should work.

public interface IProductionLineGroupFormatter<out T> where T : ProductionLine
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<T> ProductionLines { get; set; }
}

And like Jordão's solution:

public class TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter : 
  ProductionLineGroupFormatter<TissueProductionLine>, IProductionLineGroupFormatter<TissueProductionLine> {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer

I'd do it this way:

public abstract class ProductionLineGroupFormatter<T> where T : ProductionLine 
{ 
    public string Render(ProductionLineGroup<T> group) 
    { 
        foreach (T line in group.ProductionLines) 
        { 
            AppendProductionLine(line);
        } 
        return sb.ToString(); 
    }
    protected abstract void AppendProductionLine(T line);
} 

public class TissueProductionLineGroupFormatter : ProductionLineGroupFormatter<TissueProductionLine>
{ 
    protected override void AppendProductionLine(TissueProductionLine line)
    { 
        sb.Append(@"<tr> 
                        <td>" + line.Name + @"</td> 
                        <td>" + line.Actual + @"</td> 
                        <td>" + line.Target + @"</td> 
                        <td>" + line.Variance + @"</td> 
                        <td>" + line.PercentOnTarget + @"</td> 
                </tr>"); 
    } 
} 
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