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ArrayList<Byte> bytes = new ArrayList<Byte>();
try {
    int data = putObjectRequest.getInputStream().read();
    bytes.add((byte) data);
    while (data != -1) {
        data = putObjectRequest.getInputStream().read();
        bytes.add((byte)data);
    }
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

I want to convert this to byte[]. is this this the only way?

byte[] byteArray = new byte[bytes.size()];
for (int i = 0; i < bytes.size(); i++) {
   byteArray[i] = bytes.get(i);
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

I'd suggest using a ByteArrayOutputStream instead of an ArrayList<Byte> to collect your input:

ByteArrayOutputStream bos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
try {
    int data = putObjectRequest.getInputStream().read();
    while (data != -1) {
        bos.write(data);
        data = putObjectRequest.getInputStream().read();
    }
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
byte[] byteArray = bos.toByteArray();

This avoids the horrible overhead of boxing and unboxing every byte. (I also fixed a small bug in your original code where you would write -1 if putObjectRequest was empty.)

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byte[] byteArray = new byte[bytes.size()];
for (int i = 0; i < bytes.size(); i++) {
   byteArray[i] = bytes.get(i);
}

Yes, this is the only way.

byte[] byteArray = bytes.toArray(new byte[bytes.size()]);

Using toArray() as proposed in another answer does not work because the method can't automatically convert the wrapper type Byte to the primitive byte.

share|improve this answer
    
With an ArrayList implementation this is fine but it will run in polynomial time on any linked list implementation. Writing to object array and then iterating through with static casts is safer because guarantees linear time. –  Sam Grondahl Sep 6 '12 at 19:07
    
@SamGrondahl - OP is using ArrayList, which is not a linked list implementation. –  Ted Hopp Sep 6 '12 at 19:25

Using ArrayUtils in Apache Commons:

byte[] byteArray = ArrayUtils.toPrimitive(bytes.toArray(new Byte[bytes.size()]));
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2  
Which uses the code in main-- answer, I'll bet. You'll have to decide whether you prefer three lines of code or one line of code and a JAR dependency. –  duffymo Sep 6 '12 at 19:13

Nope. Easier:

Byte[] byteArray = bytes.toArray(new Byte[bytes.size()]);

And if you really want primitives:

byte[] primitives = new byte[byteArray.length]
for (int i = 0; i < byteArray.length; i++) {
  primitives [i] = (byte)byteArray[i];
}

This guarantees you linear time complexity for both linked list and resizing array implementations.

It's been supported since 5.0:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/ArrayList.html#toArray(T[])

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/ArrayList.html

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/ArrayList.html

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true, this doesn't even compiles –  daydreamer Sep 6 '12 at 18:50
2  
The OP wants a byte[], not a Byte[]... I guess? –  Lukas Eder Sep 6 '12 at 18:53
    
Yes, I wanted byte[] not Byte[] as mentioned in OP –  daydreamer Sep 6 '12 at 18:54
    
it is not necessary to pass array size as an argument. –  Ali Sep 6 '12 at 18:55
    
So instead of simply iterating over the original ArrayList<Byte> as OP is doing, you propose converting the ArrayList<Byte> to a Byte[] and then iterating. How is this an improvement? (OP is using ArrayList, not some random linked list implementation.) –  Ted Hopp Sep 6 '12 at 19:22

You could always use something like TByteList from trove4j, instead of your ArrayList<Byte>. Your algorithm would then become:

TByteList bytes = new TByteArrayList();
try {
    int data = putObjectRequest.getInputStream().read();
    bytes.add((byte) data);
    while (data != -1) {
        data = putObjectRequest.getInputStream().read();
        bytes.add((byte)data);
    }
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

byte[] byteArray = bytes.toArray();
share|improve this answer
    
This won't quite work, since TByteList is an interface. It would need to be TByteList bytes = new TByteArrayList();. Then it wouldn't be much different from using the core ByteArrayOutputStream class (which would avoid a jar dependency). –  Ted Hopp Sep 6 '12 at 19:59
    
@TedHopp: Whoops thanks for the interface hint. You're right, using BAOS is probably optimal in this case. I was kind of throwing this in as an option to the OP's question "is this this the only way?" –  Lukas Eder Sep 6 '12 at 20:44

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